Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Some of us have had that un­­comfortable moment with a co-worker—an unwelcome ad­­vance, an inappropriate joke, or a colleague who just doesn’t seem to accept your consistent “no’s” to lunch or happy hour invitations. Here are five tips to fend off unwelcome behavior.

Do you “play favorites” with certain employees? Most managers would probably say “no,” but people often harbor unconscious perceptions that can influence day-to-day decision-making and job reviews of the employees they manage. Several factors unrelated to employee performance can impact evaluations conducted by managers.

After watching Garth Brooks captivate a crowd recently, I realized that I had not watched a concert. Instead, I had witnessed a magnificent presentation of his “product”—his songs. I also realized that the way this showman delivered his material carries valuable lessons for communicators in any field.

Most timesaving “secrets” are the best practices you’ve been hearing about since the advent of paper clips. The trick is, you have to try them out to discover whether they match your work style. And then you have to stick with them to gain the benefits. Here are three timesaving secrets recommended by administrative professionals:

Set aside a few minutes each week to answer questions in the Q&A section of LinkedIn ... Tack on your own comment at the top of any forwarded email messages to help the recipient understand why it’s landing in her inbox ... Keep things from falling through the cracks with Boomerang for Gmail ...
If you suspect you’re underpaid, the topic is worth broaching with your boss. But build your case first. Five guidelines: 1.  Check online salary calculators. 2.  Leave co-workers out of it. 3.  Realize need isn’t a credible reason for a raise. 4.  Quantify your worth. 5.  Seek creative solutions.
When there’s something you want at work—an assignment, a raise, acknowledgment—make better use of your time by asking yourself who has the power to help you accomplish your goals and how well you're managing those people. Apply our seven tips to leverage your skills and get what you want.
One reader didn’t agree with some of the “8 signs you work with a deadbeat” in a recent article. “I think some of the items did not necessarily have anything to do with being a deadbeat and many signs that do were left out ... "
The grammar police are applying full force to the rampant misuse of quotation marks. At least one web site and The Book of “Unnecessary” Quotation Marks are documenting the sometimes hilarious application of quotations in inap­propriate places. Examples of publicly posted signs:
They're in every office. Nosy, rude and even outright hostile co-workers drag you down. What's worse, they distract you from your work, threaten your career and drain you emotionally. When a co-worker asks you a way-too-personal question, here are 6 polite ways to respond to her prying questions... When a jaw-droppingly rude email arrives in your inbox, follow these steps...
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