Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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You’re mired in an uncomfortable relationship with a board member, your boss or a peer. In a situation like this one, a leader has some hard work to do, says executive coach Mary Jo Asmus. She likes to ask: “What is the conversation that you need to have with that person?”
When signing up for Facebook, after you’ve nailed down your basics (photo, where you’re from, where you live now, where you work, and anything else you don’t mind the world knowing), decide on your default privacy setting. The easiest and safest way to go is with “friends only.”

Just doing your job isn’t enough these days. (Workplace superstars have always known that.) “With the reality of a tight employment market, adding value beyond your job description is a must for everybody,” says Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone. He recently offered a few tips on his blog for being indispensable in your workplace:

The Navy classified Larry Zeiger 4-F because of his bad eyes. His friends had all joined the service, so he was left behind, wandering aimlessly. The young man wanted to go into broadcasting. Zeiger finally landed a job as a radio disc jockey and a new name five minutes before the show: Larry King.

After you’ve done your homework and are about to speak, remind yourself that you’ve prepared to the best of your ability. This is no time for second-guessing. And keep this old fable in mind:
Three "C's" shape the way other people listen to us, says Susan Mason, of Vital Visions Consultants. If they think we possess competence, character and a can-do attitude, they'll find us credible, and they'll be more influenced by what we say.
I recently read an article in Inc. magazine about the “5 Qualities of Remarkable Bosses.”  As someone niched in training administrative professionals, I feel strongly about adapting these skills to grow everyone’s career.
If you worry that the personal habits and behavior of your employees—particularly new hires, fresh out of school—might be holding them back (and re­­flect­­ing poorly on your organization), try these tips for reinforcing business etiquette.
When you have to deliver bad news to someone, follow this protocol that medical doctors use to tell patients about dire prognoses:
When CNN ran a report in 2010 alleging pervasive bias in the Federal Air Marshal’s Service (FAMS), authorities braced for the worst. The good news: The resulting government investigation didn’t uncover widespread discrimination. The bad news: Investigators found that many FAMS employees believe they have been discriminated against.
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