Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Get someone to agree to a change by using the PAS formula, says Fred Kniggendorf of Gravyloaf. “PAS” stands for state the Problem, Analyze the problem, then finish by offering a Solution to the problem.

If you want to be your “authentic” self, says Jason Seiden, you’re going to spend some sleepless nights in a cold sweat. “It’s not possible to find your true self without getting tested, and tested hard ..."

Every social setting involves certain “rules” of etiquette. In the workplace, the manager who pays attention to etiquette sets the tone for everyone else. Here are some tips that should be part of your daily routine:

Taking minutes wasn’t getting any easier for Terri Michaels, even after years of practice. “I had become wordy, and the minutes were sometimes eight pages. Each new director or company wanted them done differently,” she says. Finally, she enrolled in a workshop, and things changed. Now she uses these 10 best practices:

Keep a mentoring relationship going with these three tips ... See a tweet with a link you want to remember? Click the star-shaped Favorite button next to the Retweet button ... Be smart but not a know-it-all. The best employees are learners, not knowers or naysayers.
You’re mired in an uncomfortable relationship with a board member, your boss or a peer. In a situation like this one, a leader has some hard work to do, says executive coach Mary Jo Asmus. She likes to ask: “What is the conversation that you need to have with that person?”
When signing up for Facebook, after you’ve nailed down your basics (photo, where you’re from, where you live now, where you work, and anything else you don’t mind the world knowing), decide on your default privacy setting. The easiest and safest way to go is with “friends only.”

Just doing your job isn’t enough these days. (Workplace superstars have always known that.) “With the reality of a tight employment market, adding value beyond your job description is a must for everybody,” says Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone. He recently offered a few tips on his blog for being indispensable in your workplace:

The Navy classified Larry Zeiger 4-F because of his bad eyes. His friends had all joined the service, so he was left behind, wandering aimlessly. The young man wanted to go into broadcasting. Zeiger finally landed a job as a radio disc jockey and a new name five minutes before the show: Larry King.

After you’ve done your homework and are about to speak, remind yourself that you’ve prepared to the best of your ability. This is no time for second-guessing. And keep this old fable in mind:
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