Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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You never know when you’ll run into someone influential who might advance your career.
Determine how much you care about your current job.
An outstanding employee would like to supervise his own department.  You feel this would interfere with the very structure of your company, but you don't want to lose this employee.
If you manage someone who’s emotionally volatile and high strung, pay attention to how your personality reacts to theirs.
You probably know that you can benefit from more self-promotion. But then you start listing excuses: I’m shy, I’m modest, I don’t know how, etc. Raleigh Pinskey won’t hear any of it. Her book, 101 Ways to Promote Yourself (Avon Books, New York, 1997) tells how you can improve your name visibility by attracting media attention, leading community outreach efforts and networking with flair.
Career advancers don’t let themselves get taken for granted. When they sense that their hard work isn’t appreciated, they take steps to gain the recognition they deserve.
Tired of leading Monday morning staff meetings? Take these steps to wake up drowsy attendees and turn them into energetic participants.
You have little or no background in technology. But you must still manage a range of projects that involve significant investments in computers and related high-tech tools. Don’t fret.

Talk up your goals

by on January 1, 1998 6:30pm
in Workplace Communication

As you compose personal and professional goals for this year, don’t keep them all to yourself.
So much for loyalty to a single employer.
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