Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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All of us bring bad habits to the job, even CEOs. But what separates top execs from also-rans is their ability to root out destructive habits and replace them with better ones. If you really want to boost your productivity, then commit to repairing what’s broken.
Discipline and direction: These are among the favorite themes of Laura Berman Fortgang in Take Yourself to the Top (Warner Books, 1998).
When managing your employees, you may find it hard not to boss them around. But if you try to overmanage them, they may rebel.
Don’t let your anxiety cripple you when you’re turning on the charm or trying to persuade a powerful audience of bigwigs.
You like to tell your team, “I’m here to help and answer any questions.” That’s fine. But some people will more than accept your offer of assistance: they’ll enlist you to do their work for them.
Just as you avoid desk clutter by making a snap decision to use, file or discard incoming papers, apply the same method to reducing e-mail buildup on your computer.
If an employee refuses to do work or argues with you, resist the urge to fight back by declaring “that’s unacceptable” or “you better shape up.”
Always keep a pen and pad handy when you’re on the phone.
Standing up straight and balancing your weight on both feet can improve your image.
You want people to see you as bright, attentive and incredibly quick. But you secretly wonder if you’re really all that brilliant. Don’t worry.
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