Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Why waste time trying to get off the phone with a pesky telemarketer?
Here’s an easy step toward a paperless office: Internet business forms.
Trying to motivate your employees to accept new goals or an organizational change? Give them a “Reason to Believe” (RTB).
Want to earn a reputation as a savvy negotiator? Then keep quiet.
You may assume that if your employees give 100 percent, then you’re doing fine. But managers who snatch plum promotions don’t accept a mere 100 percent effort. They demand 110 percent and beyond, and they usually get it.
If you ranked your employees in terms of ability and attitude, you’d have no trouble picking the best and worst. But how about the relatively poor performers who aren’t bad enough to fire?
Warning: The way you respond to your employees’ excuses may actually encourage them to feed you more excuses. If you readily accept their reasons for being late, missing deadlines or not following directions, you can expect more problems.
Imagine an athlete who trains as a diver for 11 years, five hours a day, to make the Olympics. After finally qualifying for the Olympic trials, she suddenly suffers eye trouble. She needs immediate surgery to save her sight. Her diving career comes to an abrupt end.
No matter how talented you are—or think you are—I guarantee you’ll drop a notch in everyone’s estimation if you come across as weak or fearful. The easiest way to kill your chances of climbing higher in your organization is if you admit that you’re helpless, scared or immobilized.
When your boss gets a promotion, bask in the reflected glow of her success.
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