Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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To get your employees to write more organized memos, ask them to number their main ideas and insert bulleted supporting points.
If you feel a panic attack coming on, try controlled breathing or visualization exercises.
While managers with chronically short fuses rarely get ahead, you can still let your temper flare on occasion to send a message. The key is to control your emotions even when you’re angry, and to behave naturally so that you’re not performing an act.
Enforce a policy that all e-mail at work must relate to relevant business communication.
Don’t make a scene.
If you’re preparing slides for a big presentation, designing a promotional mailing or looking for ways to spruce up your company’s Web site, get your staff involved in hunting for vivid graphic images.
If you repeatedly chastise well-intentioned workers who make mistakes, you can breed an afraid-to-do-anything mentality.
You’re waiting for an employee to complete a big assignment. You hit all the basics when giving instructions: You gave him clear directions, answered any questions and then left him alone to get to work. Now you’re worried the task won’t get done on time because you have not heard any updates and the deadline’s approaching.
When staffers try to stall or delay making tough decisions, resist the urge to step in and make the hard call.
Q. I’m having trouble working with a colleague, who like me is a project manager. I try to foster a good working relationship, but she doesn’t try in return.
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