Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Even if you’re smarter than your boss, don’t flaunt it.
You can’t teach courage. But you can set an example and support your employees’ efforts to succeed in the face of adversity.
Advice on how to handle these sticky situations at work...
Fred Abrew, 62, became CEO at Equitable Resources Inc., a Pennsylvania utility company, after nearly 40 years of climbing the corporate ladder. He served as CEO for three years, leaving in 1997 with a “golden parachute” worth $1.35 million. We spoke with Abrew about his steady ascent to the top:
You love your job—at least 80 percent of the time. But you dread certain aspects of it and wind up dwelling on what you hate.
If you notice your otherwise fine manager getting careless or making bad judgments, indirectly raise your concern by admiring a time when the boss didn’t take shortcuts.

Show that you listen

by on September 1, 1999 6:00pm
in Workplace Communication

Go beyond eye contact to reinforce what you hear.
Yes. When greeted with an insulting comment, don’t express indignation.
If you must make a first offer, give a number far higher than you’d accept.
When you’re finished explaining what must get done, ask employees, “What’s your first move?”