Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Remember Dale Carnegie? Today, he’d make a great career coach with advice such as, “Become genuinely interested in others,” and, “Get others to say, ‘yes, yes,’ immediately.”

Replace buzz words

by on December 1, 2001 8:30am
in Workplace Communication

Shun meaningless consultant-speak when you launch new projects.
More than 2,300 years ago, the Greek philosopher Aristotle gave us a blueprint to speak persuasively.
Avoid e-mail acronyms unless you’re replying to someone who already uses them.
To listen well, you must make sure you understand before you judge. It’s easy to skip right to making a judgment.
Before you hit the Send button to e-mail your résumé, increase the odds it will enhance your reputation as a hotshot.
Career advancers complain just like everyone else. But they make sure their complaints are sound—not shrill—and heard by the right people.
Ask a small business owner about her top managers and she’ll probably rave about their skills.