Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, author Robert Pirsig describes “gumption traps” as “low quality things which destroy enthusiasm and leave you ... discouraged.”
A career coach might ask, “Where do you want to be in five years?” That’s useful but rarely translates into immediate strategy to propel you out of a rut.
If a new CEO or senior executive takes over and vows to “shake things up,” don’t fret. While it’s wise to plan for upheaval by quietly job-hunting, also use the internal turmoil to your advantage.
Soon after Kenneth Chenault joined American Express in his early 30s, he took a job as VP of marketing for the firm’s low-profile merchandise services unit.
Despite all the hype about the growth of job-posting sites on the Web, the fact is that Internet recruiting is overrated.
Follow these rules to write strong, clear memos.
When you prepare to negotiate your salary for a new job, never introduce the subject of pay.
You want influential execs to like you and remember you. But if you try too hard, they may dismiss your desperate moves.
As founder, chairman, CEO and president of Storage USA Inc., the country’s second-largest self-storage company with $250 million in revenue, Dean Jernigan understands how to create a team.
Enunciate better by loosening up your tongue and lips.