Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

A single, desktop in-box takes up valuable space, plus important papers can become lost in the stack.

Executive coach and author Debra Benton stays visible to her network of contacts.

Being asked to join the board of a hospital, charity or school certainly can boost the ego. But, to make sure you say “Yes” for the right reasons, ask these four questions, recommended by seasoned board members:

If you’ve taken the trendy paths to “manage” the knowledge within your team or organization, give up. The corporate knowledge-management model has gone bust, largely because it’s based on a publishing model: Somebody extracts information from people and puts it in writing.

All team leaders set long-term goals and objectives for the group.
Power listening is listening with empathy, putting yourself in the other person's shoes, and responding with what you understand the other person has said. The best way to become a power listener is to develop the specific skills of active listening, especially the "four R's":
"Working Wounded" columnist Bob Rosner, former Workforce editor Allan Halcrow and cartoonist John Lavin detail in their book Gray Matters: The Workplace Survival Guide "the seven deadly workplace sins" and practical ways to overcome them.
Problem: Patricia Cain, Philadelphia, asked whether to use “a” or “an” before the initialism SCSR, for senior customer service representative. Lesson: The key is whether the sound that follows the article is a consonant or a vowel sound. If you read SCSR aloud, the first sound you pronounce is a vowel sound, “ess.” Therefore, use […]

Break times and meal times for hourly employees should be used for those purposes, not for work. And you should put that policy in writing.

Your organization's employees are its strongest—but most frequently neglected—resource in the battle against theft and destruction of its valuable assets.