Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Don’t be turned off by the book’s title. The Street-Smart Entrepreneur (Addicus Books, 1998) is actually a great book for managers in large organizations as well as bootstrapping business owners. The author, Jay Goltz, levels with us about how to manage staff, hire winners and stick to a budget.
In the July issue, we suggested Jump.com as a useful Web site to help you manage a project team. Another effective tool is Yahoo! Messenger, a free instant messaging service (messenger.yahoo.com).
Don’t rush to open humorous messages that coworkers e-mail to you.
Here’s a technique to avoid putting off work.
You’re stuck with a colleague you hate. Rather than complain, be mature.
Motormouths jump on whatever you’re saying and babble at will. Don’t let them.
When making contacts at a conference or mixer, you already know not to dominate the conversation.
When you terminate employees, make every effort to minimize their embarrassment.
If you’re a team leader who needs to coordinate a group’s activities and meeting times, save yourself hours of hassles by logging online.
You assume you know what it takes to get ahead at your organization. So you dress for success, document all your decisions in detail and attend all company functions religiously.