Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

You’re tired of hiring consultants to train your staff. You want your employees to learn about change management, teamwork and communication skills by doing—not sitting and listening to “experts” lecture about it.
You know how I tell brown-nosers from everyone else? They try so damn hard to feed me what I want to hear. It’s pathetic.

Shy and soaring

by on November 1, 1999 12:00am
in Workplace Communication

You don’t have to speak in a booming voice and offer an extra-firm handshake to make your presence felt. Even if you’re painfully shy, you can use your soft-spoken demeanor to get ahead.
Go-getters stand out. They keep themselves visible without hogging center stage. And they ensure that once they produce results, their hard work isn’t forgotten.
Q. An employer offered to hire me on a 30-day trial basis. I accepted the “consultant fee” without negotiating because I have bills to pay. Should I have played the “Is-that-your-best-offer” game?
I knew a guy with a great résumé. He had technical expertise, a nice mix of job experiences and a steady work history. He interviewed well, too.
Q. I finally quit my job. My last day is coming up, and I’m tempted to tell my boss what I really think of him. (It’s not pretty.) Am I free to vent?
Q. About two months ago, my boss asked me to do a project. I’m too busy to get started, and he knows it. Is there a way out?
Q. A co-worker overheard me saying bad things about her to my boss. I thought she had left for the day, but she was standing just outside the door. Now I’m mortified, especially because this co-worker stands a good chance of becoming my boss. Should I apologize?
When a boss seeks your input, be blunt