Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

If you come right out and insist that your boss or employees trust you, you won’t get results.
Build rapport with employees by showing that you’re not all business all the time.
You’ve just learned that you won a big account, earned a promotion or received approval from the top brass to implement your idea. Before you spread the word, hold off a day or so.
If you use e-mail to communicate with employees, set the right example: Only send messages on safe, noncontroversial matters.
You’re often privy to confidential information like impending layoffs or a corporate merger. As much as you’d like to tell your employees, you can’t. You must keep quiet until final decisions are made.
You’re a hotshot. You get things done and rarely make mistakes. But even though you don’t screw up often, you’re human.
Q. A fellow manager and I are dueling for a VP spot that will open up soon. We were friends. Now we’re so intent on showing each other up that relations are getting testy. I’m worried things will only get worse, but I want that promotion. Ideas?
Q. My boss hates his job and his life. He’s cynical about everything, and no matter what I do he doesn’t seem to champion my cause. I’ll never move up with him in the way. Am I stuck?
Q. What’s the best way to make my boss aware of a colleague’s shoddy work? My boss seems oblivious, and it’s affecting my job.
Q. I moved into a new office two months ago. My company promised me all new furniture, but it hasn’t arrived yet. No one’s following up and I’m getting tired of waiting for decent furniture. I’m sick of nagging. What else can I do?