Workplace Communication — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 350
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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Try these tips to get you through your busy day.

Many employees come with a built-in feedback deflector. Some seize only on the praise you offer, ignoring the criticism. Others assure you they "got it" but don't follow through, or argue that the inadequate performance you saw was an exception.
Customer-service workers are the face of your company, and they’re especially vital at smaller businesses. So, don’t just rely on a résumé and a good first impression to choose such employees.
End with a preposition only when it keeps you from sounding hopelessly stilted.
Ensure the success of your next presentation with these three keys:
Cement group decisions by asking your team this one question:
Even if you earned every bit of what you’ve achieved, you’ll win over more followers and avoid any taint of arrogance if you show gratitude. Take Don Cooper, pitching coach for the Chicago White Sox and the man perhaps most responsible for leading this team of castoffs into last fall’s World Series.
As an Arizona state senator in 1971, Sandra Day O’Connor began her campaign to have a woman appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. O’Connor had to decide which social conventions to keep and which to toss. She decided to keep wearing dresses, but here are two “rules” she flouted:
Robert Crandall headed engineering and manufacturing at Eastman Kodak during the “copier wars” with Xerox back in the 1970s. He faced two problems:
When you have to deliver bad news to your people, follow this protocol that medical doctors use to tell patients about dire prognoses:
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