Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Go-getters stand out. They keep themselves visible without hogging center stage. And they ensure that once they produce results, their hard work isn’t forgotten.
When a boss seeks your input, be blunt
Q. What is the protocol for a job seeker who submits a résumé and is told “action will be taken in one week?”
Q. An employer offered to hire me on a 30-day trial basis. I accepted the “consultant fee” without negotiating because I have bills to pay. Should I have played the “Is-that-your-best-offer” game?
I knew a guy with a great résumé. He had technical expertise, a nice mix of job experiences and a steady work history. He interviewed well, too.
Q. I finally quit my job. My last day is coming up, and I’m tempted to tell my boss what I really think of him. (It’s not pretty.) Am I free to vent?
Q. About two months ago, my boss asked me to do a project. I’m too busy to get started, and he knows it. Is there a way out?
Q. A co-worker overheard me saying bad things about her to my boss. I thought she had left for the day, but she was standing just outside the door. Now I’m mortified, especially because this co-worker stands a good chance of becoming my boss. Should I apologize?
If a beloved boss leaves and you now report to a newcomer, don’t sulk, praise the “old way of doing things” or resist reforms.
Prepare for a meeting with a top exec by asking, “What does this person need from me?”