Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Every day is filled with interruptions, ringing phones and a flood of incoming information. Yet, certain events each day are different from everything else. They’re opportunities. Unless you’re on the lookout for them, they pass you by. To catch them:
Private conversations alone can’t mobilize your people to execute a strategy. To initiate a conversation that matters, make sure it covers these bases:
We all hear about the importance of networking, but how do you measure the strength of your networking skills? Take this quiz and find out.

Stress may be inevitable, and it can be a positive force. But your ability to keep from burning out is important not just for your productivity in the office but your physical health, as well.

How well do you work with other team leaders in your organization? That's an important question, because without good peer relationships, it's very difficult to coordinate projects or work cooperatively across team lines.
Even in workplaces where casual dress is the norm, managers and leaders wonder whether they should be dressing differently—that is, better—than their team members. Here are some points to consider:
Experts say that reports of conflict between older workers and younger managers are greatly exaggerated—but generation gaps do create issues that both sides need to address. Here are some questions to ask:
Issue: You know how to help employees who are fired or laid off. But HR people often forget those principals when facing that
problem themselves.
Benefit: With proper planning ...

If you're a "hyperhelper" or "give-aholic," ask yourself these questions, suggested by a psychologist, when someone asks you to do something:

Problem: A case of "dangling modifier": when the subject of your sentence doesn't agree with the description that precedes it.