Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Based on the experiences of men who ran for U.S. president and didn’t make it, here are some lessons on how to recover from failure:
Back in 1952, Sid Caesar was the highest-paid entertainer in America, earning more than $1 million a year for his NBC variety show, “Caesar’s Hour.” But that show brought incredible pressure. On weeks when programs were aired, Caesar and his team locked themselves behind closed doors for days, perfecting every joke and skit.
Sandy Stash was handed an assignment from hell: Atlantic Richfield Co. sent her to Butte, Mont., to manage the cleanup of the nation’s biggest Superfund site, reduce the company’s liability and try to calm everybody’s nerves.
Here’s some advice to aspiring leaders from Jodi Solomon, president of a speakers bureau in Boston:
How effectively are you conveying the image that you strive to build as a leader? To find out, perform this simple test over the next workday:
Saint Augustine postulated that the human mind is made up of little chambers that will hold whatever is directed into them.  Fill those images with success, you become successful; fill them with regret, you will fail and become bitter. This is true of organizations as well. Here’s how one admin put that idea into practice while working for New York City's government.
From the movie “A Beautiful Mind,” you might get the idea that the important thing about mathematician and economist John Nash is that he won the Nobel Prize for creating a “theory of everything.” For leaders, though, the important thing about Nash is his obsession with originality. As more and more organizations become labs for innovation, those who lead will be the ones who create the most original products and services. Take these steps to develop a unique way of seeing things and to maintain your creative momentum:
Test your career and work-related goals to see if they stand up to these four questions:
George Stalk’s fiercely competitive spirit has helped companies around the world play to win ... decisively. His gospel of continuous improvement in a “virtuous cycle” exhorts leaders to set the pace, never to rest on their laurels and to stretch out the life span of each product. Here are Stalk’s strategies:
Every day is filled with interruptions, ringing phones and a flood of incoming information. Yet, certain events each day are different from everything else. They’re opportunities. Unless you’re on the lookout for them, they pass you by. To catch them: