Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Here are some pointers on using body language to improve your effectiveness:
When your enterprise first announced it was moving to new, nicer digs, you were ecstatic. That is, until you realized how much effort you were expected to invest in working with the space planners to organize the new office build-out.
Use e-mail as Bill Gates does: to flatten the hierarchy in your department or organization.
In his later years, Winston Churchill napped every afternoon, leaving these instructions: “Wake me only in the event of a crisis. I define a crisis to be the armed invasion of the British Isles.” The point: Leaders know the difference between a crisis and a routine setback. Do you?
When you occupy the dark-horse position, how can you beat the front-runner? Be quiet, consistent and stick to your message. That’s exactly how Woodrow Wilson won the 1918 Democratic presidential nomination.
Here’s a lesson from John F. Kennedy on how to press on through the din of detractors:
Marie Curie overcame gender bias, poor working conditions, scandal— even a World War—to become one of the most important scientists of the 20th century. Here are a few lessons to take from her struggle:
Sam Walton opened his first Wal-Mart store in Rogers, Ark., in 1962, the same year that far bigger retailers started Kmart, Woolco and Target. Arkansas was so far off the beaten path, though, that Walton didn’t attract much attention. At least, not until he came from behind and pulled up nose to nose with the big boys. With the benefit of hindsight, it’s interesting to note how simple Walton’s success formula was:
Sometimes, a leader’s duty is simply to ensure the institution’s survival. In the case of Queen Elizabeth II, her duty is to preserve the British monarchy, an institution more than 10 centuries old. Also known as CEO of “the Firm,” Elizabeth accepted her duty as most of the world’s monarchies were crumbling away.
Leaders solve problems. So, it should come as no great shock that Barbara Kavovit, who owned her own construction company but wanted more creative work, would hit on the idea of designing a tool kit for women. She got the notion while watching “Sex and the City” in 2001, when one of the female characters wanted to put up curtains but didn’t know how.
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