Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

How to respond to a few uncomfortable scenarios involving employee-employer confrontations
To draw out shy employees, start by asking a simple, fact-finding question.

Evolve!

by on January 1, 2000 3:00pm
in Workplace Communication

Enlightened managers have the knowledge and savvy to get the most from their team. Core principles guide them: fairness, clear communication, openness to change. They admit what they don’t know and seek answers wherever they can find them.
Try “Guess My Lie,” an ideal game when you want people to get to know each other better and lower their defenses.
Even the sturdiest keyboard can malfunction if liquid spills into the base. Tell staffers to keep their coffee or cola far from their keyboards.
Launch a regional job search. If you’ve targeted a city and industry to work in, check regional Web sites.
You’re in a bind: You manage a highego, power-hungry schemer who tramples over peers and alienates underlings. But he also brings impressive talent to the job and isn’t easy to replace.
There’s an art to taking notes. If you compulsively jot down everything, you may miss the nuances of a speaker’s message. But if you refuse to lift your pen, you may daydream and miss the point.
To draw out shy employees, start by asking a simple, fact-finding question.
It’s easy to persuade people who are inclined to agree with you. The real test comes when you’re dealing with stubborn employees or closed-minded bosses itching to find fault with your proposal.