Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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When Pennsbury High School junior class President Bob Costa was asked to take on a mission—persuade local-but-soon-to-be-national pop star John Mayer to play the 2003 Pennsbury High junior prom—he agreed.
The following novels are old, corny and sexist. But they were the most popular “get ahead” books of their day because they taught effective lessons about success.
Carole Howe’s strengths lie in her imaginative concepts: tickle-your-fancy ideas that brought shops like Bow Wow Meow, Field & Stream and Fly Babies into airport concourses. But Howe, founder and president of the specialty retail group that operates Creative Kidstuff, The Paradies Shops and other successful airport retail franchises, admits that she isn’t much of a planner.
For the average person, fear offers a warning to stop. For leaders, fear offers evidence that they’ve arrived at an important juncture.
Richard Scrushy, Ken Lay, Bernie Ebbers: Are you listening? A recent study shows that companies run by superstars who’ve won major awards from the business press underperform their competitors and markets in the years after winning, as they start spending more time on things that don’t help the company.
Maybe landing on the beach in Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944, is what turned Waverly Woodson from a soldier into a leader. A U.S. Army medic with the all-black 320th Antiaircraft Barrage Balloon Unit, Woodson arrived near the back of the first landing wave. Ahead of him, the Germans were mowing men down.
We all love the whole right brain/left brain thing, but it’s too simplistic for reality. The truth: Accountants can be creative, too. Take Samuel Insull. This “starched English bean-counter” who took care of finances, personnel, mergers and day-to-day business for Thomas Edison, was one of the few people who saw what electric power could do.
Al Roker wanted to be more than a weatherman, but the NBC meteorologist and Today Show co-host always remembered the advice of his mentor, Willard Scott:
“The secret to creativity,” Albert Einstein once said, “is knowing how to hide your sources.” Case in point: The physicist Galileo Galilei may have built one of his most famous theories on a description from Dante’s Inferno.
Choking is a two-part process that can hit whenever the stakes are high: You tell yourself that something will go badly. You then under-perform to ensure that your prediction comes true. How can you stop choking?