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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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If you’re leading a training session with your staff, follow adult learning principles to ensure that everyone absorbs your main points.
If you want to convince a resistant colleague to listen to you, appeal to her in a straightforward, reasonable manner. Don’t resort to GAS—guilt, anxiety or shame—as a way to get her to agree with you.
The most talented go-getters often find older, wiser mentors to guide them early in the careers. But as more young managers ascend to the executive suite while still in their 20s and 30s, they are finding that they surpass their mentors in terms of pay or chain of command—and might even become their mentor’s boss.
An interview with Winston Wallin, former president of Pillsbury Company and CEO of Medtronic, Inc.
When you want to propose your ideas in a persuasive manner, organize your points in threes: situation- options-solution.
Dealing with an employee who longs to break the rules.
When you want to give an employee a set of facts (such as dates and times of upcoming meetings), warn her before you start spewing out data.

Avoid oversmiling

by on September 1, 1998 6:30pm
in Workplace Communication

Everyone likes a cheery, positive co-worker. But don’t overdo it.
All the data in the world won’t help you manage better unless you sift through it to make sound judgments. Amassing vast information can actually work against you if you become immobilized by all the facts at your fingertips.
How to react to a number of uncomfortable situations in the workplace
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