Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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We all know how terrified most people are to speak in public. If you want your team members to master this fear and become effective group communicators, try these techniques:
Draft your next presentation quickly and easily.
Maybe you’d prefer not to compete, compete, compete. That’s what Alexandra McGilloway decided, so her business model is based on collaboration and complementary products rather than competition. In 14 years, East West has become the largest spiritual bookstore in the Northwest. Last year, it took in $1.7 million, about 5 percent more than in 2003.
Ask your vendors to tell you how they can charge you less.
Don’t view your network as a one-way street.
Anybody can excel at the tasks they love. People who rise to the top also excel at what they don’t love.
Steve Demos, who once practiced Buddhism in a cave, started making tofu in a bathtub and selling it at his tai chi class about 20 years ago. By 2001, his organic food company boasted the nation’s best-selling soy milk: Silk.
You can find lots of reasons to covet someone else’s position: The person who’s in it has burned out; you can do it better; it’s time for a change, etc. But sniping and politicking make you look like the last person who should get that job if it comes open. Here are two better ways to position yourself:
Aside from his unearthly talent with a ball—“any kind of ball,” says a childhood friend—what made former New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath almost unstoppable on the gridiron was his toughness. It came from his three older brothers.
By now, you’re probably sick of the wretched saga at Disney. Be that as it may, court testimony about the mess still offers lessons about precisely how not to confer and administer authority.