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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Sell with prompts

by on December 1, 1998 1:00pm
in Workplace Communication

Win over others with questions, not lectures.
When you miss a promotion or lose your job, take a broad perspective.
Whether you’re sending an e-mail or a paper memo, incorporate the three Bs of clear writing: brevity, bullets and beauty.
Smart managers treat note-taking as a vital skill. The act of writing down what they hear helps them retain key points, brainstorm for ideas and make connections between diverse elements.
All of us bring bad habits to the job, even CEOs. But what separates top execs from also-rans is their ability to root out destructive habits and replace them with better ones. If you really want to boost your productivity, then commit to repairing what’s broken.
Discipline and direction: These are among the favorite themes of Laura Berman Fortgang in Take Yourself to the Top (Warner Books, 1998).
When managing your employees, you may find it hard not to boss them around. But if you try to overmanage them, they may rebel.
Don’t let your anxiety cripple you when you’re turning on the charm or trying to persuade a powerful audience of bigwigs.
You like to tell your team, “I’m here to help and answer any questions.” That’s fine. But some people will more than accept your offer of assistance: they’ll enlist you to do their work for them.
If you’ve begun telecommuting, here’s a good way to maintain your visibility in a faraway home office: Ally yourself with key customers in your town.
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