Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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After the battles of Shiloh and Vicksburg, when Ulysses Grant had developed fully as a general, he was called upon to resolve a crisis in Tennessee, where Chattanooga had become a trap for Union forces. Grant’s decisions underscored his competence, in these ways:
A recent Wall Street Journal article asks a question on the minds of many managers: "In an era when almost anything goes, are any topics still taboo at work?"
In an ever-changing world of work, proper workplace etiquette never goes out of style. Here's some insight from expert Peter Post, as reported on Forbes.com:
Managers have been trained in any number of strategies and systems to resolve conflicts. But most of those can be implemented only after you've made this basic first choice—Do I avoid, bargain or control?

Question: I'm retiring before the end of the year at age 64. My accountant says I've earned too much salary this year to receive any Social Security benefits. I thought the earnings test was eliminated years ago. If not, is there anything I can do now? Or do I have to work longer? — J.M.B., Boise, Idaho

Stay in tune with your people by refusing to multitask when someone pops in your office.
Use a change in weather as an excuse to review your wardrobe.
Marketing exec Jeffrey J. Fox doesn’t like the old saying that if you do what you love, success will follow. His view: “Take the job that offers you the most money. If you are in a corporation, always take the transfer, promotion or assignment that pays the most.” Sounds mercenary, until you hear Fox’s rationale:
Mackay Envelope Co. CEO Harvey Mackay built his empire by negotiating strategic deals … with paper makers, printers, suppliers. Nearly everything he built involved a deal. Here are Mackay’s six top rules for power dealing:
Show that you’re a leader who’s on top of thing.