Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

To bring a company legend to life, former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina created a list of principles invoking the story of how two buddies in a garage started the company.
William Paley virtually invented mass entertainment after founding CBS, the dominant network through much of television’s history. A few of his approaches:
Anybody ever called you a control freak? If so, you’ll recognize some of this behavior:
Marcus Tullius Cicero, the famous Roman orator born in 3106 B.C., survived decades of political turmoil and lived a long and productive life as one of Rome’s most illustrious citizens. One reason: He cultivated close friends whom he could rely upon for support.
Develop the habit of saying “Please explain that to me” in meetings; then, ask it again until you learn all you need to know.
When you think you’ve achieved wisdom, respect and greatness, you haven’t.
Don’t take all the heat when delivering bad news.
Biographies show that Franklin Delano Roosevelt was much better at envisioning goals than making detailed plans for how to reach them.
If you’ve ever led a creative team, you know that you have to shield it from the bean counters, the marketers and the salespeople ... especially when ideas are new.
Cut down on the time it takes to scan large reports by using the Auto-Summarize function in Microsoft Word.