Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

These steps sound basic, but omitting one can kill any benefits you would’ve reaped from taking an important person to lunch.
You probably know Gen. George S. Patton for his “blood ’n’ guts”approach to battle, but he dedicated himself to something far less obvious:  preparation.
Learn from the last samurai, Saigo Takamori, who’s still revered in Japan 120 years after his death for his courage, simplicity and fairness.
In high-stakes negotiations, sitting across the table from your opponents ends the signal that you are enemies, not collaborators who are looking for solutions that meet both your needs.
Whether you're negotiating with a customer, your boss, a peer, or an employee, use these guidelines to help maximize your chances for a successful outcome.
The folks at OfficeTeam asked respondents in a recent survey to identify areas where their bosses could improve. The responses they got are worth your attention:
If your networking and connections helped you become a manager, your workers may view you as the "boss's pet." Here's some advice:
It's clear that you can require bank tellers and phone salespeople to speak fluent English. But can you make the same demand of a construction worker or dishwasher?
In many ...
Over the past week or two Maria and Betty, your most experienced register jockey, have gotten into at least half a dozen arguments. You've determined that Betty and Maria are apparently fighting over a man. The information shocks you.

You can make travel arrangements that are cheaper and better for your boss if you pay attention to a few details.