Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

After summer vacations end, call your team together for a special meeting to review priorities and set projects for the fall and winter.

The little scrape on the corner of your desk. The run in your stocking or the tiny spot on your tie. The minor typo on the fourth page of your report. The whiff on your breath that tells people you had wine with lunch.


Grease the wheels for feedback at your next meeting with these four words: “What do you think?”
We’ve all hit slumps, but perhaps none as bad as the one New York Yankees’ shortstop Derek Jeter fell prey to when he failed to get a hit in 32 consecutive at-bats.
When John H. Johnson launched Ebony in 1945, it quickly became such a success that he could barely print copies fast enough to keep it on newsstands. Yet, the magazine aimed at African-Americans made little money because white-owned companies refused to advertise in it.
When Arthur Gaston found himself working at a coal and iron mine in Alabama after World War I, he wondered how on earth he’d ever get ahead. At a time when college graduates couldn’t find jobs, Gaston didn’t even have a high school diploma.
He was smart: He studied law and passed the bar in six months. He was honorable: He never spoke a word against his wife after a mysterious marital blowup that ended his career as Tennessee governor. He was brave: His mother exhorted him not to disgrace the musket she gave him, and he never did.
First, he cracked the code of wave physics and created the perfect synthetic wave. Now, he’s designed a surf park opening in Orlando next year that will provide eight-foot, Oahu-style waves with the flick of a credit card.
Bob Lutz, the automotive wizard who championed the Dodge Viper and Pontiac’s new GTO, hates “windy” business language. To cut down on the jargon and sound more like a down-to-earth leader, say:

The greatest ideas and creations are infectious, said Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy. People can’t stop thinking about them. They feel drawn to the person who spawned the idea. And they bond with other people who’ve come under the spell of the same idea.