Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Here’s another reminder that you don’t have to reinvent the wheel to succeed:
When Kevin Tsujihara took over Warner Brothers’ Home Entertainment Group last October, he stepped into a cauldron of warring divisions with disparate initiatives that included home video, digital distribution, video games, technical operations and anti-piracy efforts.
Even in the shadow of the U.S. soccer team’s collapse in this year’s World Cup, coach Bruce Arena speaks with calm assurance. “One day, when we get it right and become the best,” he says, it will be because “we did it our way, no one else’s way.” In that statement alone, you can see why Arena is a leader.
New York Yankees manager Joe Torre leads a far more diverse and ego-driven team than most of us ever will. Yet, Torre’s team wins repeatedly, thanks to these four “rules of straight communication” he has developed over the years:
Former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner is one of those “connector” people.
As master of an astonishing range of roles on stage and screen, Hugh Jackman seems to have conquered his world. But Jackman—the owner of roles as diverse as flitty song & dance guy Peter Allen in Broadway’s “The Boy From Oz” and macho superhero “Wolverine” in the blockbuster “XMen” movie series—never would have succeeded if he’d bowed to his fears.
Filmmaker Spike Lee’s career shows the basic elements every leader needs. Here’s what we mean:
The late Jesse Helms, a former senator from North Carolina, was known as a tough sell when it came to foreign aid. That is, until rock icon Bono showed up.
John McGraw, fierce third baseman of the 1896 Baltimore Orioles who’d already led his baseball team to two pennants, drove the club through force of will … his will to win. So, when McGraw came down with typhoid fever, things started looking grim for Baltimore.
When he acquired high-end lawn mower manufacturer Snapper in 2002, CEO Jim Wier’s lowest-priced machine sold for about $350. Because Wal-Mart also sold six other kinds of mowers for less than $200, Wier decided to pull the plug on his marketing deal with the giant retailer. But, feeling that he owed an explanation, Wier headed to Arkansas to meet a Wal-Mart VP.
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