Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Practice these three “higher ground” roads to success:

In most lines of business, it’s better to be a doer than a waffler. But former House Majority Leader Dick Armey puts a finer point on the issue.
Sometimes, you have to jolt productivity upward by halting it.
Only weeks after Tavis Smiley lost his job as host of Black Entertainment Television’s “Tonight With Tavis Smiley” show, the affable host was deluged with job offers.
At some point, you’ll have to prove that the way you believe in doing things is right. And until you can prove it, you’ll have to rely on people’s perception that things are headed in the right direction.
In his youth, Saint Augustine (A.D. 354-430) lived a somewhat wild existence. One night, he and his rowdy friends stole a beautiful little tree from someone’s yard for no reason.
Good leaders encourage both teams and individual stars, even when the dominant culture is oriented toward teamwork.
Don’t overlook this critical factor when you’re negotiating: how the other person feels about the issue at hand.
You're no prude, but some of your employees can be downright foulmouthed, particularly when people or things aren't "cooperating." This hurts both their image and that of the team, and you want to make a change. Here's some expert advice:

Standardized replies save you time but can cost you good will. Create templates and common paragraphs that you can pop into an e-mail or letter, then easily personalize. Use these shortcuts: