Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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A recent survey from OfficeTeam found that senior executives have retreated behind their screens; e-mail has become the most common form of dialogue at work for 71 percent of respondents, with only 25 percent opting for either the telephone or face-to-face meetings.
With the ever-growing emphasis on workplace wellness and work-life balance, it's becoming more common for employers to have fitness rooms on site or arrangements with nearby gyms. It means you'll be working out with your employees. Or your boss. It's a whole new venue for office politics and etiquette!
You're a supervisor at a fast-growing enterprise, and your boss transferred to another region two months ago, leaving an opening you'd very much like to fill. But when the VP, Arlene, tells you "The promotion is yours—congratulations!" you don't feel anywhere near as excited as you expected you would.
Reader Sharon Wentzell sent us this question: “When you use parentheses at the end of a sentence, where does the period go: inside or outside the last parenthesis?” Answer: When you have a full sentence inside parentheses, and it isn’t positioned inside another sentence, it should begin with a capital letter and end with a […]
Encourage “break the mold thinking” by asking team members to interview 10 people outside your organization about the challenges you’re facing
Break a negotiation deadlock by saying “In other words …,” then restating the other person’s position.
Make better decisions by devoting more time to understanding the viewpoints of those who don’t agree with you
During its Golden Age 2,500 years ago the city/state of Athens created democracy and produced some of the greatest art and architecture in history, yet could rise to military excellence when threatened. Here are some ideas for leading your organization toward that kind of durable greatness:
In 1953, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis played London’s Palladium, the first appearance in England for what back then was America’s top entertainment act. The Palladium audience loved them … except for a few anti-American demonstrators in the balcony, who booed. The next day, several British papers carried headlines that read, “Martin and Lewis Booed.”
Kelly Slater’s older brother used to turn everything into a contest, and he always made sure Kelly lost. That, coupled with their drunken father and angry mother, forged Kelly Slater into a fierce competitor and a wild man on a surfboard.