Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Sports legend Bobby Jones made up his mind in 1930 to do what no other person had ever done … or has done since: Win all four major tournaments—the British Amateur, the British Open, the U.S. Open and the U.S. Amateur—in the same year. Then, he figured, he’d quit, set up for life.
Keep your mind sharp by feeding it new “software” to run.
If it seems inconceivable to you that Lewis “Scooter” Libby ever could have outed an American spy and then lied to cover it up, consider this: He’s merely the latest example of a high-level operative caught in the ancient trap of considering himself among the best and the brightest, a tribe whose members think they don’t have to play by the rules...
Two people on separate continents— one a Chinese doctor, the other a Nigerian activist—have bucked tremendous pressure and scorn to lead entire villages out of the despair and destruction of AIDS epidemics. Here are their stories:
Being a steelworker on a big construction job is literally living on the edge, and that’s right where Ugo “Hokey” Del Costello likes to be. “If I [screw] up,” says the project boss for the massive new Woodrow Wilson Bridge that will connect Maryland and Virginia across the Potomac River, “I could kill somebody.” Despite the extreme nature of his job, Del Costello is a leader in familiar ways:
During France’s recent riots, one political figure stood out from the mob: Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy.
Both the New Orleans levee break after Hurricane Katrina and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 were predictable surprises. That is, they were disasters that could have been prevented. Here are the traits of predictable surprises (with Sept. 11 and Katrina examples), and the steps you can take to keep them from happening:
Sure, leaders are steady and dependable. But they also know the power of doing surprising things when their gut tells them to. Some unexpected actions that yield results:
Use this checklist to recover from a failure and keep moving forward:
Many people confuse leaders’ confidence with self-confidence. In fact, what’s important about leaders is whether they have confidence in other people. Here are Harvard business professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter’s three cornerstones of confidence: