Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

What can you learn from Google? To obsess about producing the very best product, and never to become lazy, arrogant, complacent or “evil.” In more concrete language, here’s what that vision statement means:
New York chef Marcus Samuelsson combined traditional Swedish cooking with ingredients from around the world to create novel dishes that made his restaurant famous.
Pythagoras of Samos, who lived in the sixth century B.C., is best remembered for his pioneering studies of the geometry of triangles. He is less well known for his three-part assessment of people, based on his observations of the people who came to Athens to watch the Olympic games.
When Eckhard Cordes took over Mercedes-Benz, he put off all interviews with the press, so he could engage in hard analysis before announcing his sales objectives.
Early on, Neil Armstrong didn’t want to be an astronaut. From a young age, he wanted to design aircraft. He took up flying later because he thought a designer should know how planes work. He became a “stick-and-rudder man.”
As a graduate student at the University of Chicago in 1970, Michael Powell opened a used bookstore after borrowing $3,000. He built shelves, started selling and kept increasing inventory, expanding the shop and adding employees. He repaid the loan.
Deliver a tighter presentation by dividing your notes into sections and assigning a time period to each. Example: “Company Background, 9:00 – 9:10,” “Current Company Priorities, 9:10 – 9:25.” Wrap up each section on time and move on to the next.
Reap the most from your network by deciding on a few things members can do for each other.
Keep tabs on former star employees by calling them at least twice a year.
Southwest Airlines co-founder Herb Kelleher tells the following story about acquiring tiny carrier Morris Air: