Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Some lucky people seem to have been born with a greater purpose in life while the rest of us are left to search for ours. Umair Haque, director of Havas Media Labs, thinks the problem may be that we’re looking so hard. Instead, he suggests four ways we can approach the world.

Most people would agree that it’s important to manage your emotions in the office. But is it appropriate to create official policies that would ban heated exchanges? That’s what one reader asked recently on the Admin Pro Forum.
Legendary marketer David Ogilvy once said, “When you advertise fire extinguishers, open with the fire.” It’s good advice for business presenters. Captivate your listeners from the first seconds of your talk. To organize the first minute of your speech, prepare in threes:
It’s hard for employees to do their best work when their bosses yell at them, and, thankfully, this type of outburst is quickly becoming a thing of the past in most workplaces. But some people are still expressing their anger in harmful ways. However, there are some constructive ways to resolve office disputes.

Don’t worry if you have a hard time coming up with brilliant suggestions at the office or if you’re not the first one to come up with the next big thing. You surely have colleagues with bright ideas, and there are a few ways for you to walk away with credit for them.

A large percentage of people have to deal with colleagues who frequently complain, according to a study by Cloud Nine Media. Such negativity isn’t just annoying; re­­search shows it can also take a toll on your brain’s ability to function properly.
It’s easy to become frustrated at work, but yelling won’t help you get your point across. Instead of screaming, use a calm tone and focus on the situation at hand, recommends Amy Levin-Epstein.
The first week at a new job can be stressful. There are so many new people to meet, passwords to memorize and new software systems to learn. How can you make that onboarding process more welcoming?
You shouldn’t list jobs that you held for only a short time when you’re writing out your résumé because companies may view these temporary stints as a red flag, writes Lindsay Olson. Other résumé mistakes to avoid:

Before you address an audience of one or 100, know your goal and prepare an outline to stay on track. Start with simple ideas and add complex points (evidence, details, case studies) gradually. Consider the pros and cons of four formats:

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