Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Before you address an audience of one or 100, know your goal and prepare an outline to stay on track. Start with simple ideas and add complex points (evidence, details, case studies) gradually. Consider the pros and cons of four formats:

Networking is an essential part of building and sustaining a successful professional career, but it’s a skill that doesn’t come naturally to many people. When people refer to it as “schmoozing,” it can sometimes feel downright sleazy. It doesn’t have to be that way, though.

Most leaders acknowledge the importance of listening. But few know how to do it well. Listening raptly requires more than keeping quiet and maintaining eye contact with the speaker. You need to signal that you’re intent on understanding what you hear—and retaining it.

Acronyms and abbreviations are a great way to tighten up your writing and save yourself some keystrokes, but they’re only clear to insiders who use them on a regular basis. Good writers are careful to follow these rules for using acronyms and abbreviations.

Can you switch between first (I or we) and third person (he, she or they) in the same paragraph? Writing coach Lynn Gaertner-Johnston says you can, as long as you allow clarity to be your guide.
Experts in corporate communications advise leaders to deliver bad news in five steps: tell it all, tell it fast, explain what you’re doing about it, make it clear when it’s over and get back to work. In 2010, Hewlett-Packard’s board failed to follow these steps.
Are you aware of how much you influence others daily? Here are three techniques to increase your ability to persuade and gain results.
Speaking in public can be a nerve-wracking experience for many people. But you can learn to manage your nerves, says Darlene Price, speaking coach and author of Well Said! Presentations and Conversations That Get Results. “Fear is what drives nervousness,” she says.
Fight procrastination ... Bring all your calendars in sync ... Become a great networker ... Seize the power of LinkedIn recommendations ...

If you’re always setting goals you never seem to accomplish, the problem may be that you’re doing it wrong. Next time, try these tips from Ken Cheo, principal at Winfree Business Growth Advisors.

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