Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

“Wisdom is the daughter of experience,” wrote Leonardo da Vinci (1492-1519), possibly the most brilliant artist and thinker who ever lived. Luckily, da Vinci left us his instructions on converting experience into wisdom:
The U.S. president known as a fierce fighter, Indian hater and hothead—Andrew Jackson—actually used wallpaper to help him lead the country. Wallpaper?
While trading pelts in Newfoundland, a young Clarence Birdseye noticed the way Inuit Indians froze fish by laying them on the ice, where they froze almost instantly. He also noted that the cooked fish remained tender and flaky—almost as good as fresh.
At age 15, Billie Jean King (then, Billie Jean Moffitt) and her classmates were assigned to write a scene from their futures. Here’s what she turned in:
Formula One Grand Prix drivers, like successful executives, have the passion to reach the top of their professions. Yet, even within this elite group, only a tiny percentage take the winner’s stand.
The Talmud, an ancient Jewish text, tells us that everything we do affects everyone around us. This story illustrates the point:
Benjamin Franklin was already a successful businessman, inventor and politician when he arrived in London in the decade before the Revolutionary War. But he was about to risk everything, unwittingly, by misreading what his customers—Pennsylvania colonists—wanted.
Résumé fudging comes in all flavors. First, comes the straightforward lie. Consider this story: Several years ago, the New York Port Authority wanted to know how many of its applicants would lie. It advertised an electrician job with experience using Sontag conductors. Nearly a third of those who responded said they’d had such experience. The […]

Problem: Phyllis Nagy, Orlando, Fla., asked about the spelling of the possessive "boss's."

Test yourself by circling the one word in each of the following pairs that's spelled correctly.