Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Thomas Edison wanted smart, practical men to help run his empire of inventiveness. (As far as we know, he never hired a woman.) So, he devised a test to measure each applicant’s breadth of reading and knowledge.
“Winnie the Pooh” creator A. A. Milne also wrote serious works of fiction. Yet, his greatest success came from the Pooh books he wrote for his son. Milne considered himself a failure because he didn’t achieve fame the way he wanted.
Paul DePodesta’s brain processes information statistically, so when he left Harvard in 1996 with an economics degree and landed an internship with the Cleveland Indians Major League Baseball team, he’d already run the numbers for every baseball team in the 20th century.
Recent research confirms that optimists accomplish more than cold realists do.
Cash in on the break from routine when you travel.
Stretch your network while flying on business by catching up on paperwork or writing a memo, instead of kicking back and watching the movie.
Make it easier to ride herd on two, three or more complex projects by creating a master schedule of all their check-in dates, deadlines and other actions.
Eleven years ago, Dell Computers held 20 to 25 days’ worth of inventory in its warehouses. Now, it has no warehouses.
A leader’s knowledge is deep, based on experience and knowledge of the industry, the organization and its clients.
Do you have a lucky tie? A power perfume that you wear to high-stakes meetings?