Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Some employees love to “borrow” everything from pens and scissors to start-up software CD-ROMs.

Reading in a rush?

by on December 1, 2000 5:30pm
in Workplace Communication

Scan the first and last paragraph of a long document.
Nine out of 10 people daydream in meetings, according to Training & Development.
Your boss walks into your office to deliver bad news about a lost account, late shipment or assembly-line bottleneck. Score major points by replying like a CEO.
Even if you’re a high-achieving superstar, bragging about your accomplishments won’t endear you to higher-ups.
The two biggest mistakes that otherwise smart people make in choosing their careers.
You ask for ideas, but they come at a price. Some employees will repeatedly insist they have a great idea and prod you to act on it.
Don’t assume you must sound crestfallen.
Some CEOs don’t like to listen to naysayers. But Gregory Slayton, head of ClickAction Inc. in Palo Alto, Calif., loves an argument.

Give an overview

by on December 1, 2000 5:00pm
in Workplace Communication

Give an overview before you plead your case in any situation.