Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Nine out of 10 people daydream in meetings, according to Training & Development.
Your boss walks into your office to deliver bad news about a lost account, late shipment or assembly-line bottleneck. Score major points by replying like a CEO.
Some CEOs don’t like to listen to naysayers. But Gregory Slayton, head of ClickAction Inc. in Palo Alto, Calif., loves an argument.

Give an overview

by on December 1, 2000 5:00pm
in Workplace Communication

Give an overview before you plead your case in any situation.
You ask for ideas, but they come at a price. Some employees will repeatedly insist they have a great idea and prod you to act on it.
Don’t assume you must sound crestfallen.
With nearly 30 years of experience and several awards for selling animal health products, Marvin Fisher was assigned to a top sales unit after a company merger. About a year later, the company...

Listen or bust

by on November 1, 2000 11:00pm
in Workplace Communication

You can barely restrain yourself. You want to talk but there’s no opening.

Grade your ethics

by on November 1, 2000 11:00pm
in Workplace Communication

Three-quarters of employees observed violations of the law or company standards in the previous 12 months, according to a June 2000 survey by KPMG, an international consulting firm.
How to deliver bad news that needs delivering.