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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Q. I deal with a domineering VP who uses the quizzing technique. Instead of telling us something, he quizzes us to see if we can read his mind. Is there a diplomatic way I can get him to answer his own questions?
Q. My salary review was scheduled for July. But my boss said that due to the potential reorganization of the company, my salary increase could not be addressed until after the board met to discuss changes. Should I sit tight and trust my boss?

Gather lists

by on September 1, 1999 9:30pm
in Workplace Communication

Whether you’re job-hunting or you want to expand your circle of contacts, target the right group.
You should be expanding your skill set every 100 days or so.
Try to participate in meetings when your boss huddles with his boss.
Even if you’re smarter than your boss, don’t flaunt it.
You can’t teach courage. But you can set an example and support your employees’ efforts to succeed in the face of adversity.
Advice on how to handle these sticky situations at work...
Fred Abrew, 62, became CEO at Equitable Resources Inc., a Pennsylvania utility company, after nearly 40 years of climbing the corporate ladder. He served as CEO for three years, leaving in 1997 with a “golden parachute” worth $1.35 million. We spoke with Abrew about his steady ascent to the top:
You love your job—at least 80 percent of the time. But you dread certain aspects of it and wind up dwelling on what you hate.