Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Effa Manley was the only woman owner in the Negro baseball leagues. Manley co-owned the Newark Eagles with her husband Abe, but it was Effa who ran the show.
As a new Marine Corps lieutenant, Peter Pace arrived in Vietnam just in time for the Tet Offensive, during which about 84,000 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese fighters attacked 36 cities and towns in the early months of 1968. Now a general, Pace tells two stories of how he developed as a leader.
Use these eight strategies for avoiding the rookie mistakes new leaders often make:
“Ninety-nine percent of people, once they learn how to do something, stop improving,” says K. Anders Ericsson, professor of psychology at Florida State University and co-editor of Expert Performance in Sports.
“To go too far,” Confucius said, “is as bad as to fall short.” You can go too far with working hours. In fact, overwork can contaminate your career. Here’s how:
Blogger Brendan Connelly—"The Slacker Manager"—recently posted on his popular site on "How to avoid office politics." Here's some of his insight:
It's no easy task to criticize someone else's work without offending the worker. Yet every day managers have to find ways to critique the work of their employees. Here's how smart managers succeed at that task:
Do you ever attempt to take a com­prehensive look at your own job satisfaction? Here's an adaptation of an assessment that's been used by thousands of managers over the years.
Problem: Lisa DiBuono, a legal administrative assistant in Greenwich, Conn., wants to know whether to capitalize seasons. Lesson: When you’re referring to a season, keep it lower case. If the word is part of a formal title, capitalize. Correct: “We’ll begin office renovations in the spring.” “The office dress code for summer is more relaxed.” […]
It pays—literally—to keep tabs on what the competition is up to. By analyzing your competitors, you can anticipate new opportunities and developments in the market, make better operations decisions and more effectively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses.