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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Stress flows from self-doubt. If you constantly question your skills or talents, you can wind up succumbing to your worries.
To show your even-handedness, toss in “retractors”—words that help you present both sides of an issue.
Your employer assigns you a mentor. This person’s supposed to give you guidance, offer feedback and serve as your ally.
When delegating team projects, identify concrete, measurable standards you’ll use to judge each employee’s performance.

Trust but verify

by on November 1, 2000 10:30pm
in Workplace Communication

If a colleague insists he’s right because “I’ve been here longer than you” or “Just trust me, I know this,” don’t believe it.

Negotiate more perks

by on November 1, 2000 10:30pm
in Workplace Communication

Rather than demand flextime, bonuses or telecommuting right now, think ahead.
While you should gesture freely when giving a speech, it’s bad to gesticulate when trying to impress your boss one-on-one.
“It’s not my fault. It’s Jan’s fault.”
Do you suffer from scriptophobia? If you’re afraid to write a memo, gain confidence by adopting these rules.
An interview with James J. Treacy Jr, TMP Worldwide's Chief Operating Officer