Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Creativity. It’s a fairly new buzzword in business. Now comes research from Harvard business professor Teresa Amabile to debunk the myths about it. For the past eight years, she’s run a diary study of hundreds of managers “to look at creativity in the wild.” Amabile has uncovered these myths:
When team members' personal problems affect their work on an ongoing basis, it can spell disaster for team morale and productivity. Here's what team leaders can do when such problems are affecting their results.

Problem: Writers who never studied Latin often mix up the abbreviations i.e. and e.g.

The basic information required for noting sources hasn't changed since you wrote a high school term paper, but the wealth of information available in electronic formats continues to add new twists.

Use quick “Got a second?” chats on the fly, rather than lengthy meetings, to stay on top of things.
Determine whether the people you’re considering promoting are ready to break with their current jobs
At many organizations, work groups are creating Web log (“Blog”)-style pages so they can easily communicate about projects.
Most of us believe that seeing into the future is impossible. Not so. We actually have a good idea of many things the future holds. We just need to access that knowledge. To do so, take out three sheets of paper. Label them “One year from now,” “Five years from now” and “10 years from now.” On each, answer questions like these:
Based on the experiences of men who ran for U.S. president and didn’t make it, here are some lessons on how to recover from failure:
For your people’s sake—or for yours—let’s blow up these four excuses for not networking: