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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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It’s hard for employees to do their best work when their bosses yell at them, and, thankfully, this type of outburst is quickly becoming a thing of the past in most workplaces. But some people are still expressing their anger in harmful ways. However, there are some constructive ways to resolve office disputes.

Don’t worry if you have a hard time coming up with brilliant suggestions at the office or if you’re not the first one to come up with the next big thing. You surely have colleagues with bright ideas, and there are a few ways for you to walk away with credit for them.

A large percentage of people have to deal with colleagues who frequently complain, according to a study by Cloud Nine Media. Such negativity isn’t just annoying; re­­search shows it can also take a toll on your brain’s ability to function properly.
It’s easy to become frustrated at work, but yelling won’t help you get your point across. Instead of screaming, use a calm tone and focus on the situation at hand, recommends Amy Levin-Epstein.
The first week at a new job can be stressful. There are so many new people to meet, passwords to memorize and new software systems to learn. How can you make that onboarding process more welcoming?
You shouldn’t list jobs that you held for only a short time when you’re writing out your résumé because companies may view these temporary stints as a red flag, writes Lindsay Olson. Other résumé mistakes to avoid:

Before you address an audience of one or 100, know your goal and prepare an outline to stay on track. Start with simple ideas and add complex points (evidence, details, case studies) gradually. Consider the pros and cons of four formats:

Networking is an essential part of building and sustaining a successful professional career, but it’s a skill that doesn’t come naturally to many people. When people refer to it as “schmoozing,” it can sometimes feel downright sleazy. It doesn’t have to be that way, though.

Most leaders acknowledge the importance of listening. But few know how to do it well. Listening raptly requires more than keeping quiet and maintaining eye contact with the speaker. You need to signal that you’re intent on understanding what you hear—and retaining it.

Acronyms and abbreviations are a great way to tighten up your writing and save yourself some keystrokes, but they’re only clear to insiders who use them on a regular basis. Good writers are careful to follow these rules for using acronyms and abbreviations.

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