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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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You have a friend who’s looking for a job and your company has an open position. You think she would be a good fit, but you wonder if this is one of those good deeds that’s unlikely to go unpunished.  That’s what one reader asked recently on the Admin Pro Forum.

It takes a variety of personalities and work styles to make up a successful workplace, but differences can cause misunderstandings and conflict on the job. To stay productive and professional, you have to learn to handle these differences. Rebecca Thorman, author of the “Kontrary” blog, has five strategies to help you do just that.

You know to avoid verbal fillers, move about the room and make eye contact with your audience, but what separates a marginal presentation from a great one?
Career experts advise spending at least a couple of hours a week engaging in networking activities, including emails, phone calls and in-person contacts. You should also demonstrate your expertise online by sharing ideas and answering questions via social media and in online forums.

To win over others, it’s tempting to recite every possible reason why they should accept your proposal. Psychologists call this the Presenter’s Paradox: We assume that more is better when we try to convince others when, in fact, limiting our pitch to only the most appealing reasons works better.

LinkedIn updated its user profiles in late 2012, and you’ll want to update yours to make it look great in the new format, says technology columnist Debra Donston-Miller.

When addressing senior executives, every minute counts. Make your point succinctly—without tangents or long stories—and end decisively. Consider these structural frameworks when organizing your material:

Highlighting your achievements to those who can advance your career can be painfully awkward. But research shows that to get ahead, we have to make those with influence aware of our achievements. You want to be a human highlighter.

If you spend your energy attacking your adversaries, that’s energy that could have been exerted elsewhere. It also makes you appear hot-headed and small.
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