Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

While planning new HR initiatives and making your HR budget projects for 2011, don’t forget to factor in one crucial aspect: Convincing your chief financial officer to back your proposals. You can improve your chances of securing CFO support by using the following information to improve your presentations.

Four sentences that need repair, along with fixes: 1. Subject/verb agreement. 2. Actionless, dull sentences. 3. Negative structure. 4. Comma splice.

Even when gainfully employed, leaders keep trolling top job-related web sites in the event of an executive-level layoff. Here are five sites plucked out of about 50,000 U.S. career portals and databases.

The economy isn’t the only thing that’s in a slump these days. Plenty of workers are in the doldrums, too. They feel stuck in their jobs because new ones are hard to come by. They can’t afford to retire. So they’re not performing as well as employees who look at their jobs as labors of love. Here's how HR can help get them back on track.

When it makes sense, you can shift income and expenses at year-end to your tax advantage. Here are 10 ways to trim your personal tax bill in 2010.
When making a presentation, ward off audience boredom by making it interactive. Here are four ways to deliver, according to “5 Tips for Making Your Presentations More Social”:
Finding out that someone with your title and job description makes more money than you can rattle your nerves. Here’s how to handle it:
The EEOC has just issued final regulations implementing the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA), the federal law that makes it illegal for employers to use genetic information to make decisions about health insurance and employment. Download the final regs here, and then use them as the basis for reviewing your wellness program and other work processes that might violate GINA.
Question: “Last year, our company celebrated the holiday season at a bar near our office building.  This event was basically an “alcohol fest” that began after work and continued late into the evening. I never drink alcohol because my father died of alcoholism. Also, I really don’t care for the taste. However, I’ve found that when I decline a drink, people regard me as strange. Sometimes they become insistent and insulting, saying things like “What’s wrong with you?” or “Are you in recovery?”  Apparently, I am the only person in this entire group who doesn’t drink. It hurts to be called an oddball, so I’d like to be less conspicuous.  I was a new employee at last year’s party, but this time I want to be prepared.” —Abstainer

Administrative pros looking for a way to stretch their skills often turn toward certification. But do the Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) and Certified Administrative Professional (CAP) ratings help you advance your career? Or command a higher salary? Are they worth the work and cost?