Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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For Susan Ershler, reaching her goal didn’t just feel like climbing a moun­tain. She actually did climb one—or, rather, she climbed the tallest mountain on each continent. Ershler now tours and speaks about how she accomplished seemingly impossible goals, all while holding high-ranking sales positions in Fortune 500 companies.

Do you multitask while checking your BlackBerry? According to Ryan Hamilton, an assis­tant pro­fessor of marketing at Emory Uni­ver­sity, you may have a more difficult time controlling your temper or staying on a diet. A new study finds that frequently switching your mindset weakens your self-control.

If a colleague tries to sabotage you in front of the group, here's what you should do: 1. Don’t approach someone for a discussion until you can think rationally. 2. Immediately address issues. 3. Stand up for yourself in a professional manner. 4. Wrap up on a positive note. 5. Report back to your boss.
Workplace conflicts often arise because different people have different ways of doing things. Tips for navigating a clash of the styles:
What’s your reputation at work? Chances are, everyone in your office has a “rep.” The Chirpy One. The Sloppy Dresser. The Bad Breath Guy. Fairly or unfairly, we tend to label people in our minds—and those labels change the way we treat our co-workers.
“The first day of work,” says an administrative assistant on her blog, “is like the first day of school ... overwhelming.” You have to make new friends, learn the new rules, get to know a new teacher. Wel­come a newbie with these tactics:

You might be surprised by the information that exists about you online. Manage your online reputation with these tips from Riva Richmond, a technology writer who recently spoke about the topic on a New York Times podcast:

Great minds don’t always think alike, a new OfficeTeam study suggests. Work styles vary based on personality traits, communication preferences and organizational methods.
Adecco’s 2011 Workplace Outlook Study asked men and women whether they thought they’d receive a raise, bonus or promotion in the coming year. More than 40% of men said they thought they would receive a raise. But only 29% of women did. What accounts for the difference?
When actress Lindsay Lohan opted to wear a short, snug-­fitting white dress to her court appearance, public relations pro Meryl Weinsaft Cooper wrote on her blog, “The dress spoke volumes, though clearly not about what she had hoped it would.” What can we learn from Lohan’s wardrobe dysfunction? Plenty.
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