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Office Politics

There are few things as uncomfortable as dealing with difficult workers. Yet dealing with them successfully is a key to business success.

Business Management Daily is known for our sound, field-tested advice on favoritism in the workplace and other challenging office personalities and situations.

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It’s hard for employees to do their best work when their bosses yell at them, and, thankfully, this type of outburst is quickly becoming a thing of the past in most workplaces. But some people are still expressing their anger in harmful ways. However, there are some constructive ways to resolve office disputes.

Office politics doesn’t have to be manipulative or sleazy. In fact, it’s one of the most direct, smart and savvy ways to make your mark with those that count. Here are three rules to win the game of office politics.

It pays to be a good politician, according to a new survey by Robert Half. Workers were asked, “In your opinion, what effect, if any, does involvement in office politics have on one’s career?” Their responses:

Tired of an incessantly negative co-worker? Post a “No Whining” sign for others to see when they enter your work space.
Winning at office politics could begin with this key question, “Who am I dependent on to get my job done?”
You work like a dog for the organization every day. You stay up at night trying to keep pace with the constantly changing rules and regulations of employment law. You’re even called to put your own career on the line when the organization is hauled into court. Why is that?

A senior executive unfairly chastises your favorite colleague and concludes, “He’s no good.”

When there’s something you want at work—an assignment, a raise, acknowledgment—make better use of your time by asking yourself who has the power to help you accomplish your goals and how well you're managing those people. Apply our seven tips to leverage your skills and get what you want.
If a colleague tries to sabotage you in front of the group, here's what you should do: 1. Don’t approach someone for a discussion until you can think rationally. 2. Immediately address issues. 3. Stand up for yourself in a professional manner. 4. Wrap up on a positive note. 5. Report back to your boss.
In recent rulings, the Supreme Court clearly signaled its unwillingness to tolerate even the appearance of circumventing the nation’s anti-discrimination laws. Employers must have investigative procedures in place to help guide decision-making when an employee could be disciplined or terminated.
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