Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

Which are you more likely to write: “Do not waste energy” or “Conserve energy”? Using positive, self-assured, optimistic language is a better way to promote your ideas. In the above example, “Conserve energy” is more persuasive because it makes readers feel good rather than admonished. Here are 5 examples of negative sentences turned positive:
Gap plans to hire 1,200 workers from community colleges this year, and it’s preparing them for those jobs by training them while they’re in school. The clothing chain has partnered with Atlanta Technical College in Gap for Community Colleges.

As an admin, you may be tasked with helping to set agendas, scheduling and taking minutes. But how much power do you have to keep meetings productive? Plenty. Look for clues in the way meetings work at Google. You may find that not all of these tips are replicable at your office, but it’s a place to start.

Job descriptions are the cornerstone of communication between you and your staff. Job descriptions can also be useful tools in court. Make sure you have job descriptions for all employees’ positions. Then keep those descriptions updated whenever the duties change.

What would a conversation be without a speaker and a listener? Not a conversation at all. You need both. Yet we tend to focus on how well we perform as speakers, not as listeners. How much energy do you put into your listening skills? Polish up your listening skills with these tips:

Jargon can complicate the most simple of messages. So why in the name of Web­­ster’s does the babble persist? “People use jargon because they want to sound smart and credible when in fact they … typically can’t be understood, which defeats the purpose of speaking in the first place,” says Karen Friedman, author of Shut Up and Say Something.

For most problem employees, deteriorating behavior and performance is a gradual process. Smart employers track the downward trajectory along the way.
Your software is sluggish; your gadgets are glitchy. Here are seven easy updates that will improve your technological life. For starters, get a smartphone—having instant access to your e-mail, calendars, address book, GPS and anything on the Internet will make your life easier.

One of your best weapons, when it comes to persuading others, is an adaptable communication style. Look out for these four styles of communicators, and adjust your approach when working with them:

The next time you're ready to deliver a presentation, don't let nitty-gritty audio problems make you even more nervous before stepping up to the mike. You don't want to start the presentation with "Can you hear me now?" Set the stage to set off on the right note, by answering these questions: