Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

Too often, people express themselves negatively without even realizing it. If your writing contains a lot of “no’s” and “not’s,” it’s a signal of negative writing. Using positive, self-assured, optimistic language is a better way to promote your ideas. Here are examples of negative sentences turned positive:

Does it matter if we misspell words or use abbreviations in email messages? Opinions are mixed. Everyone, however, agrees that when you’re working on written correspondence or an important document, it has to be flawless. Can you spot the grammar and writing errors in the sentences?

Without you realizing it, low morale can creep into your organization. Check every day to make sure people stay in tune. Here are 10 sour notes to listen for:

Follow these steps to make strangers feel comfortable and eager to learn more about you.
How to be a good listener and effectively communicate with your staff.
How to think before you speak and use your words effectively.
How to effectively convey your meaning in less time.

There’s nothing humdrum about the Form 1040 you’re about to file with Uncle Sam. Thanks mainly to the economic stimulus law passed last year—the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act—the ’09 return is chock-full of tax breaks for the well-informed. Here are 10 tax moves to wake up to this year:

Question:  "Although I’m viewed positively at work, I believe my reserved demeanor is holding me back. I’m not shy, but I have trouble making small talk. In meetings, I give input whenever I’m asked, but seldom volunteer information. As a result, I’ve been labeled a quiet person. Although I prefer working alone at my computer, I know that won’t get me where I want to go. Can you suggest some communication strategies for meetings and social situations?" -- Not a Talker

Courts are cracking down on serial lawsuits, and the result is good news for employers. A former employee who sues and then loses his case can’t keep coming up with new claims to base new lawsuits on. If the new claims are based on the same set of facts—even if they involve an entirely different legal angle—courts are ruling the claims should have been brought together.