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Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

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Question:  “I feel that I am being ignored because of my age. I am a young employee who recently attained a position in which I have to interact with top-level managers. When I request information from them, I find it difficult to get responses. I believe they are not taking me seriously. How should I handle this?” — Young & Frustrated
 

Do you "play favorites” with certain employees? Most managers would probably say “no,” but people often harbor unconscious perceptions that can influence day-to-day decision-making and job reviews of the employees they manage. Several factors unrelated to employee performance can impact evaluations conducted by managers.

Sometimes it seems like supervisors and employees work in entirely different places. For years, researchers have known that bosses and line workers have widely varying views about things like priorities, performance ratings, communication and benefits. Here are eight areas for which recent studies have revealed major disconnects between what employees want and what their bosses think they want:

E-mail—often quick and informal—is the standard for most business communications these days. But if you’re too casual in the way you word e-mails, you could wind up in lots of legal trouble, as the following case shows.

Considering the toll the obesity epidemic takes on Americans’ health, you’d think Dr. Jason Newsom’s bosses in Panama City would be happy with his campaign to educate the public about the dangers of obesity. Fat chance. While attacking sweet tea, burgers and fries was all right, it was doughnuts that doomed the doc.

Participation in new “social media” outlets is on the rise, creating many questions for employers. Should we be using social media to develop business or to recruit new talent? Should we allow employees to use social media at work? What types of restrictions do we need? Can we monitor off-duty conduct? And what are the potential liabilities?

Employers often have many reasons for choosing one candidate over another. You should document all business-related reasons for your decision. But you don’t have to list them all in the rejection letter you send. Feel free to provide just one reason.

More than 33 million Americans now work remotely at least one day per month, according to the “Telework Trendlines 2009” survey report. Still, most managers have been trained to work with employees who are only physically present to them. How can you manage what you can’t see? Here are some tips for bosses who manage teleworkers:

If you read only headlines, you may think U.S. employers are slashing employee benefits to the bone. Not so. But the weak economy is forcing organizations and their employees to make some tough choices, particularly in compensation and benefits. Here are seven key HR trends to look for, plus tips on how to respond.

True or false: Employees are either creative or they’re not—creativity isn’t a skill you can teach. False. Managers can play a key role in creating an environment in which employees will want to look for new ideas. Share this article with your supervisors to help tap employee creativity.

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