Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

Three managerial goals are featured for the month of July.
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Remember what a stamp was? You’d slap it on an envelope, and the letter inside remained private. But technology has changed—and so has privacy expectations of work communications. When employees send text messages on employer-provided phones, are those texts as private as a message in a bottle … or a message in the sky? The U.S. Supreme Court penned a long-awaited warning last week: For now, employees shouldn’t expect text messages at work to be private.

Even pro presenters can put some shine on their communication skills. Mary Civiello, an executive coach and author of Communication Counts: Business Presentations for Busy People, offers four tips to be your best in front of a crowd:
Cut down on meeting time by remembering the three purposes for having a meeting in the first place: to inform, to gather input or to ask for approval. Tell attendees which of those goals your meeting will achieve.

Social media is on the rise, creating many questions for employers. Should we use social media to develop business or recruit new talent? Should we let employees use Facebook and Twitter at work? What restrictions do we need? Can we monitor off-duty conduct? And what are the potential liabilities?

A statewide leadership program in Kansas is training people how to get things done. Bob Sage is a case in point. Promoted to police chief of Rose Hill in 2002, he wanted to learn new ways to teach and lead. “Cops are alpha males, and everyone is trying to be leader of the pack,” he says. “You tend to have a real dominant personality.” The Kansas Community Leadership Initiative taught him different ways people learn and various approaches to lead them.

As unemployment continues to hover near 10%, the temptation to stretch the truth on a résumé is becoming harder for desperate job-seekers to resist. That’s why experts say job applicants are doing more “creative writing” on their résumés these days. And hiring managers need to be more vigilant. Some tips:

How to respond on a human level when interviewing without overdoing it.
To identify fibbers, retain the details they reveal (facts, figures, their stated whereabouts). Then find out whether those details ring true.