Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

When looking for a new job, don’t overlook the importance of culture. You won’t learn what you need to know by asking generic questions such as “What’s the culture like?” or “Are people treated well?”
The Associated Press Style­­book has given its blessing to using the adverb hopefully, meaning “it is hoped.”“This may not seem like a big deal, but to many linguistic sticklers it is the end of the world of correctness,” Lynn Gaertner-Johnston noted.
You never know when you’re go­­ing to need some friendly help or support, writes J.T. O’Donnell, career strategist and workplace consultant. She suggests keeping the peace with your co-workers by avoiding these potentially offensive questions:
Concrete examples bring abstract writing to life. Not only will examples help readers more easily imagine what you’re talking about, they’ll add pop to your prose.
Here's a list of the 15 most common misspellings in the United States, according to SpellChecker.com, along with the correct versions:
Asking questions is more effective than trying to know all the answers, says Andrew Sobel, author of Power Questions: Build Relationships, Win New Business, and Influence Others. The right questions “make people like you, trust you, and want to work with you.”

Organizations tend to get insular. You and your team can easily start thinking from the inside out instead of from the outside in. Some ways to get closer to your customers:

“A change agent,” write the authors of Who Took My Pen ... Again?, “has the courage to see things that are and know they could be better, and to see things that aren’t, and work, dream, plan, and learn about them, in order to bring them into reality.”

What’s the rule on these four sentence-starting and -stopping strategies? 1. Starting a sentence with “and” or “but.” 2. Launching a sentence with “There is” or “There are.” 3. Ending a sentence with a preposition. 4. Starting a sentence with “how­­ever.”

You’ve probably heard the one about Gen Y’ers wanting—and ex­­pect­­ing—constant feedback. Two things to know about that generational myth: First, it’s not ex­­actly true. Second, if you accept it at face value, it could get in the way of good intergenerational relationships.