Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

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Take this quiz to see how well you understand the general guidelines for preparing presentations.

Anyone who has worked for two or more bosses can tell you: The division of labor often leaves you feeling stretched both ways. But with some schedule-wrangling and communication skills, you can manage the work more smoothly.

When dashing off your next memo, report or e-mail, cut right to the core points. Readers see your writing as a reflection of how you think, so keep it direct and logical.

Expectations get lost if communicated poorly, so how you encourage followers is just as important as what you’re encouraging them to do. Here’s how to communicate effectively:

Sometimes, it seems that persuading the boss—or anyone—to let you try your great idea is more difficult than ... well, just about anything. So, we asked three successful admins for their best tips on steering the boss toward agreement. Here they are:
In a Robert Half International survey, employees rated “working for a stable company” and “having a strong sense of job security” as the two most important factors about their work situation. Robert Half District President Brett Good suggests that organizations should leverage that new desire for stability during the hiring process. Here are six ideas from the survey that might work for you:
Hard-driving, “results-at-all-costs” executives actually diminish the bottom line, while self-aware leaders with strong interpersonal skills deliver better financial performance. So says a recent study by organizational consulting firm Green Peak Partners in collaboration with researchers at Cornell University.
Q. Admittedly, this is an odd-ball question. My HR department just received a complaint from an employee about risqué e-mails that some of her co-workers were trading back and forth. Coincidentally, the employee who complained is also slotted for termination because of poor performance and attendance problems. Is there any risk in terminating this employee in light of her recent complaint?
Nearly half of U.S. workers work for someone younger than they are, according to a recent Career Builders survey. It's not always easy. Here are five tips for getting along with that supervisor who was in high school when you were already well established in your career.

You don't need the word "chief" in your title to act as a leader to the troops. Show that you possess the qualities for promotion by exhibiting these leadership traits:

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