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Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

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Which are you more likely to write: “Do not waste energy” or “Conserve energy”? If your writing contains a lot of “no’s” and “not’s,” it’s a signal of negative writing. Using positive language is a better way to promote your ideas.

What’s your reputation at work? Chances are, everyone in your office has a “rep.” The Chirpy One. The Sloppy Dresser. The Bad Breath Guy. Fairly or unfairly, we tend to label people in our minds—and those labels change the way we treat our co-workers.
“The first day of work,” says an administrative assistant on her blog, “is like the first day of school ... overwhelming.” You have to make new friends, learn the new rules, get to know a new teacher. Wel­come a newbie with these tactics:
Great minds don’t always think alike, a new OfficeTeam study suggests. Work styles vary based on personality traits, communication preferences and organizational methods.

For those who fear public speaking, here’s an even more terrifying prospect: doing improv in front of a crowd. Yet that’s exactly what CEO Mark Fuller encourages employees to do through an improv class. “Improv, if properly taught, is really about listening to the other person, because there’s no script,” he says.

You may think you've just penned the most brilliant correspondence of the year, but if it takes the recipient too long to wade through lengthy paragraphs, he'll never know how bright you are. Let's face it: Fancy-schmancy business-speak does not make for strong business writing.
Employee focus groups are a good way you can uncover issues affecting productivity and retention. Use the following steps to organize your focus groups without excessive red tape or cost:
Employees who turn out not to meet the definition of “disabled” can still sue for disability discrimination based on their employer’s perception that they are disabled. That doesn’t mean, however, that supervisors can’t express concern and sympathy when an employee reveals a problem. Nor does it mean they can’t offer accommodations at that point or explain what types of leave are available.

Do you tend to eschew the limelight, think before you speak or feel most ener­gized by spending time alone? In a survey by TheLadders.com, 65% of senior managers said that introversion was an impediment to reaching higher management levels. That finding is easily debunkable.

If you're preparing to deliver a presentation to the top brass, remember three words: Less is more. Impatient CEOs want your conclusion, pronto.
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