Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

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Many people can be hesitant at the prospect of blindly emailing a CEO or other powerful person, says management writer and entrepreneur Peter Sims. But CEOs often love to hear from their employees or customers. Sims offers these tips for sending an unsolicited message.

Meetings can be a wonderful collaboration tool or a wasteful, hostile time sink. Ideally they give colleagues an opportunity to share ideas, give kudos and enjoy one another’s company. They “are also a place where people jockey for position, work out disagreements and hurt each other’s feelings,” says Gretchen Rubin. She outlines some phrases that can really serve to undermine others.

The importance of discretion was recently reinforced during a panel discussion with four senior executive assistants who work for high-powered individuals.
Make your marketing messages stand out from all the other messages in recipients’ inboxes: Use one-word subject lines. The length and shape of a one-word message catch the eye because they look different from all the other similar-looking longer subject lines.
Joining several different types of organizations will help you develop a variety of contacts. Choose from among these seven types:
Ready to deliver your next presentation without notes? You will be able to focus on your audience instead of on a script after doing this preparation:
Sometimes a nice, warm hug is welcome. Other times—like at work—it is just awkward. That kind of display of affection can even be downright inappropriate, especially if it goes against your organization’s HR policies. When a hugger is coming at you, how do you avoid the advance without hurting the person’s feelings?
The belief that your youngest employees prefer electronic communication over face-to-face communication is false. At least that is according to Dan Schawbel, who along with Randstad U.S. conducted a study comparing Gen Y and Gen Z workplace expectations in 10 countries.
Bridge to Terabithia author Katherine Paterson has been credited with coming up with the B.I.C. way of breaking through writers’ block.
A bit of humor in a business presentation can put your audience at ease or drive home an important point. But you shouldn’t try so hard to be funny that you lose the focus of your message or risk alienating your audience.