Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

Page 13 of 101« First...10...121314...203040...Last »

How many times would you like to say, “No, I can’t help you,” but refrain from doing so? The result is an overload of work when you’re still trying to complete the projects that fall within your job responsibilities.

As many more companies transfer over to the satellite world, talent hunter Erica Breuer suggests they keep these four tips in mind to stay connected with co-workers.
Managers have a lot on their plates, which sometimes can prevent them from getting back to you about your project in a timely manner. This prevents you from moving forward and slows the process down, writes Alex Cavoulacos, a founder of The Muse. But sometimes, you can be partially to blame.
Good grammar and proper phrasing are important to projecting a professional image in the workplace. Grammarly’s Kimberly Joki reviews five of the most common incorrectly used words and phrases.
To communicate effectively and ensure you’re heard, start by adopting a mindset that values diverse opinions and demonstrates you appreciate those that express opposing viewpoints, Booher advises. Sharing a variety of viewpoints doesn’t have to lead to conflict. Next, try to employ these communication tactics.
A new email extension called Crystal can help bring more empathy to your email conversations. The most important thing is adapting to other people’s written language, says Crystal founder Drew D’agostino.
Kathleen Downs, a vice president at Robert Half Finance & Accounting, suggests administrative professionals take these steps to boost cross-departmental collaboration in their offices.
Our award for Worst Communicator of October definitely goes to Gerod Roth, who made the unwise decision to take a selfie with a co-worker’s 3-year-old child—without the co-worker’s permission—and then post it on Facebook. What happened next was the true disgrace.
If you're surrounded by co-workers half your age, it can feel isolating. They've grown up in a different world than you, and they have different priorities. How do you talk to them?
Many people use “that” and “which” interchangeably, but the words have different grammatical meanings. Here’s the basic rule of thumb: You use “that” for clauses that are im­­per­­a­­tive to the sentences, whereas “which” is for phrases and clauses that aren’t essential and usually just serve descriptive purposes.
Page 13 of 101« First...10...121314...203040...Last »