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Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

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Before you address an audience of one or 100, know your goal and prepare an outline to stay on track. Start with simple ideas and add complex points (evidence, details, case studies) gradually. Consider the pros and cons of four formats:

Most leaders acknowledge the importance of listening. But few know how to do it well. Listening raptly requires more than keeping quiet and maintaining eye contact with the speaker. You need to signal that you’re intent on understanding what you hear—and retaining it.

Acronyms and abbreviations are a great way to tighten up your writing and save yourself some keystrokes, but they’re only clear to insiders who use them on a regular basis. Good writers are careful to follow these rules for using acronyms and abbreviations.

Can you switch between first (I or we) and third person (he, she or they) in the same paragraph? Writing coach Lynn Gaertner-Johnston says you can, as long as you allow clarity to be your guide.
Experts in corporate communications advise leaders to deliver bad news in five steps: tell it all, tell it fast, explain what you’re doing about it, make it clear when it’s over and get back to work. In 2010, Hewlett-Packard’s board failed to follow these steps.
Speaking in public can be a nerve-wracking experience for many people. But you can learn to manage your nerves, says Darlene Price, speaking coach and author of Well Said! Presentations and Conversations That Get Results. “Fear is what drives nervousness,” she says.

Your body language can often make a stronger impression than the words you say or the work you do, notes Caroline McMillan. This is true especially in the conference room. Here are a few tips.

Maintaining your focus is hard enough when you’re speaking face-to-face. It’s even harder on the phone when distractions swirl around you. Five tips:

Here are three words of advice to communicate well: Make it count. Sending mass emails or holding un­­necessarily frequent meetings can test employees’ patience and distract them from higher-priority work.

A business blogger received an email with the subject line “Hi Lisa!” The From address said only “Suz.” Normally, she would have sent it to spam, but she opened it and found a note from a client requesting an appointment.
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