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Office Communication

Communication in business requires the understanding of different communication styles, and the ability to break down communication barriers.

In business communication, effective communication requires a sort of “office communication toolkit” – the kind of resource Business Management Daily provides.

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People draw conclusions about your competence and professionalism from the way you speak, so make sure these four things don’t come out of your mouth.

Legendary marketer David Ogilvy once said, “When you advertise fire extinguishers, open with the fire.” It’s good advice for business presenters. Captivate your listeners from the first seconds of your talk. To organize the first minute of your speech, prepare in threes:
A large percentage of people have to deal with colleagues who frequently complain, according to a study by Cloud Nine Media. Such negativity isn’t just annoying; re­­search shows it can also take a toll on your brain’s ability to function properly.
It’s easy to become frustrated at work, but yelling won’t help you get your point across. Instead of screaming, use a calm tone and focus on the situation at hand, recommends Amy Levin-Epstein.

Before you address an audience of one or 100, know your goal and prepare an outline to stay on track. Start with simple ideas and add complex points (evidence, details, case studies) gradually. Consider the pros and cons of four formats:

Most leaders acknowledge the importance of listening. But few know how to do it well. Listening raptly requires more than keeping quiet and maintaining eye contact with the speaker. You need to signal that you’re intent on understanding what you hear—and retaining it.

Acronyms and abbreviations are a great way to tighten up your writing and save yourself some keystrokes, but they’re only clear to insiders who use them on a regular basis. Good writers are careful to follow these rules for using acronyms and abbreviations.

Can you switch between first (I or we) and third person (he, she or they) in the same paragraph? Writing coach Lynn Gaertner-Johnston says you can, as long as you allow clarity to be your guide.
Experts in corporate communications advise leaders to deliver bad news in five steps: tell it all, tell it fast, explain what you’re doing about it, make it clear when it’s over and get back to work. In 2010, Hewlett-Packard’s board failed to follow these steps.
Speaking in public can be a nerve-wracking experience for many people. But you can learn to manage your nerves, says Darlene Price, speaking coach and author of Well Said! Presentations and Conversations That Get Results. “Fear is what drives nervousness,” she says.
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