Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

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Managing ambitious staffers has its pros and cons. While they often bring talent and drive to the job, their arrogance and hunger for advancement may prove obnoxious.
When networking for jobs, don’t present yourself as a victim (of a two-faced boss, a hapless organization, a shrinking client base, etc.).
Just as salespeople always ask for referrals to new clients, career advancers remain on the lookout for new contacts.
You probably know that you can benefit from more self-promotion. But then you start listing excuses: I’m shy, I’m modest, I don’t know how, etc. Raleigh Pinskey won’t hear any of it. Her book, 101 Ways to Promote Yourself (Avon Books, New York, 1997) tells how you can improve your name visibility by attracting media attention, leading community outreach efforts and networking with flair.
You're bothered by how directly people will approach the project of "networking"
While the quality of your work product clearly plays a role in your career advancement, there’s another, less obvious element to consider: attitude.
One of the most subtle and overlooked obstacles to career advancement is applying the right thought process to your job.
With all the mystery that surrounds getting ahead, there really are only five ingredients you need to accelerate onto the fast track, says Susan Marshall, a leadership development consultant based in West Bend, Wis.
Here’s a smart way to get ahead: Champion the cause of a hardworking, unheralded support staffer.
You’ve heard all the standard ways to network, such as chatting up strangers at a trade show and setting up informational interviews with potential employers.
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