Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

Employees everywhere are tapping their professional networks, as they look for new jobs or prepare for the possibility of a pink slip. The good news is that a number of strong associations already exist and can offer a string of networking benefits. Here are a few tips for

Fancy-schmancy business-speak does not make for strong business writing. With that rule in mind, an editor for HarvardBusiness.org suggests banning these words and phrases from your writing:

Question: I can’t seem to get promoted, even though I am well-qualified. My performance evaluations are excellent, and I have received numerous awards. The company posts promotional opportunities so that anyone can apply, but the “winning” applicant always seems to have been selected in advance. Obviously, politics plays a great part in these selections, and I am not a political person. I do interact with people, but I just don’t do it with an agenda in mind. How can I get ahead? —  No Way Out

Sticking to outdated grammar rules could be getting in the way of your business writing, says trainer Fred Kniggendorf. For starters, Kniggendorf says ignore these four grammar rules:

Whether they’re shooting off their own “tweets” or just following others, employees using Twitter—the fastest-growing social networking site—are creating liability and PR risks with their 140-character rants, raves and company gossip.

Feeling overwhelmed by the state of the world economy? I overheard a woman say she was worried about calling in sick because she was afraid her employer might fire her. This, to me, represents the difference between a career and a job. Years ago, these two words may have meant the same thing, but they don’t anymore.

If you’re still grumbling about joining Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter, know this: Social networks are good for business. “It’s very well documented that businesses that focus on marketing during tough financial times can actually improve,” says Karen Quintos, a vice president at Dell.

“My boss is driving me crazy. What can I do about it?” ... “My co-worker got a promotion, even though I do a better job.” The starting point for almost any question about your career, says career columnist Penelope Trunk, is: Know yourself better.

Employees do the darnedest things, and it’s often up to HR to clean up the resulting mess. Better to have prevented it in the first place. Two recent news stories point out problems that could have been stopped with simple policies on use of technology in the workplace. With the right handbook lingo, much corporate embarrassment could have been avoided.

Does your company have a mentoring program? About 70% of Fortune 500 companies do. Even if you don’t have a formal way to seek out a mentor, consider doing the legwork to find one on your own.