Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

“My boss is driving me crazy. What can I do about it?” ... “My co-worker got a promotion, even though I do a better job.” The starting point for almost any question about your career, says career columnist Penelope Trunk, is: Know yourself better.

Employees do the darnedest things, and it’s often up to HR to clean up the resulting mess. Better to have prevented it in the first place. Two recent news stories point out problems that could have been stopped with simple policies on use of technology in the workplace. With the right handbook lingo, much corporate embarrassment could have been avoided.

Does your company have a mentoring program? About 70% of Fortune 500 companies do. Even if you don’t have a formal way to seek out a mentor, consider doing the legwork to find one on your own.

It won’t surprise you that most companies plan to spend less on training this year. Rather than lament the fact that there’s less money in the budget for traditional training, consider this: Less-formal training might be more effective than formal training, and it still allows you to develop your career.

Financial firms could have avoided some public backlash if they’d done some early PR, says Adam Hanft, CEO of the marketing firm Hanft Raboy. Here's how to avoid a “greedy” image:

It’s becoming a common problem: An employer discovers disparaging comments on an employee’s Facebook, MySpace or personal blog. Maybe a post reveals internal company information. Can the employer take disciplinary action? It depends.

With the economy slowing down, now is the best time to fine-tune your LinkedIn or Facebook profile, fleshing out the blank spaces and figuring out how to take advantage of those social networking sites. Here are a few tips.

We’re swimming in health statistics. Every day we see new findings linking various foods or behaviors to good outcomes (veggies prevent cancer!) or bad (stress causes Alzheimer’s!).
You earn credibility by stating your case with poise and conviction. Yes, you risk rejection. But the alternative is hardly better.
You’re a loyal employee who works for an organization that you believe in. But not everyone shares your attitude.