Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

Sometimes it seems like supervisors and employees work in entirely different places. For years, researchers have known that bosses and line workers have widely varying views about things like priorities, performance ratings, communication and benefits. Here are eight areas for which recent studies have revealed major disconnects between what employees want and what their bosses think they want:

You’re promoted to a more demanding, high-profile job, and the first thing you think is, “They must have made a mistake.” That’s your Inner Critic, whose prompts can get you out of bed in the morning, on the treadmill or through a pressing deadline. But its disapproving words can also make you miserable. Here’s how to quiet your Inner Critic:

Technology is blurring the lines between work and leisure and revealing real tensions between Gen Y, Gen X and baby boomer employees. The generations have very different ideas about what is and isn’t an appropriate use of technology in the office. Here's one simple solution for bridging the gap.

A new study estimates that nearly two-thirds of Facebook users access the site at work. On average, they spend 15 minutes on the site during work hours, and the electronic back-and-forth could represent as much as 1.5% of an employer's productivity losses. The good news: You can stop it.

With a new year nearly upon us, the question arises: How will you make changes to improve your health?

Managers and employees have opposing views of privacy when it comes to employees’ off-duty postings on social networking sites, such as Twitter and Facebook. In a recent Deloitte survey, 60% of executives said they have a right to know how employees portray their companies online, but 53% of workers said their off-duty posts are none of their employers’ business.

Once you’ve found the ideal mentor—someone with the skills or career you admire—hang on to him or her. Whatever you do: 1. Don't ignore your mentor's advice. 2. Don't forget to follow up ...

Women leaders in Generations X and Y don’t go it alone or count on legal remedies to break the glass ceiling. They are highly interdependent. This distinguishes them from their predecessors. Today’s high-watt Silicon Valley women make heavy use of social networking to get ahead.

Here’s a way to test your doctor. Ask, “Do you practice integrative medicine?”
People with a negative self-image tend to make statements such as, “I could never talk in front of an audience” or “I’m just not good at negotiating.” This merely reinforces limitations.