Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

Interviewing for a job? Ask whether this is a new position or whether you are replacing someone ... Avoid misunderstandings by asking others to repeat what they heard ... Trade in old electronics for cash or discounts ... Humanize interoffice communication by relaxing some of the grammar rules you grew up with ...

One important way to judge your success as a manager is by the success of your employees. The best managers aren’t just the ones who can extract the most productivity from their people, but the ones who produce great future managers. How can you be sure that your best people will someday be top-notch leaders themselves? Start with the following basic yet effective tips for developing managerial skills among your employees.

Your best employees are probably eager for promotions. But when only one slot is open, promotions often leave several well-qualified candidates disappointed. To keep disappointment from leading to lawsuits, consider offering career coaching for those employees who didn’t make the cut.
Each month, AdminProToday.com puts together a digestible collection of 1-minute strategies that help you save time and stress. Here are the 10 most recent time-saving tips:

Question: “I recently left a very toxic workplace. I never again want to work in such a fearful, backbiting culture. Next time, how can I make sure that I’m entering a healthy work environment?  Should I ask to take a tour or interview some co-workers?” — Cautious

We never saw this coming: scholars studying the business model of the Grateful Dead. But a handful of fans did. Emerging from their archives is a portrait of visionaries in what’s now called customer value, social networking and strategic planning. Here’s how the Dead pioneered business practices embraced much, much later by corporate America.

Employers have any number of legitimate reasons to monitor employees’ e-mail and Internet usage. Beyond personal productivity issues, you risk significant loss should an employee download a virus or other damaging software or engage in illegal activity conducted on company computers. Here's a discussion of the risks, plus a sample policy ...

After a loud argument with a peer or employee, you’re mortified by your behavior. A day or two has passed. Now what do you do?
Physical exercise strengthens your cardiovascular health, but here are some ways it is also good for the brain.

Remember what a stamp was? You’d slap it on an envelope, and the letter inside remained private. But technology has changed—and so has privacy expectations of work communications. When employees send text messages on employer-provided phones, are those texts as private as a message in a bottle … or a message in the sky? The U.S. Supreme Court penned a long-awaited warning last week: For now, employees shouldn’t expect text messages at work to be private.