Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

After a loud argument with a peer or employee, you’re mortified by your behavior. A day or two has passed. Now what do you do?
Physical exercise strengthens your cardiovascular health, but here are some ways it is also good for the brain.

Remember what a stamp was? You’d slap it on an envelope, and the letter inside remained private. But technology has changed—and so has privacy expectations of work communications. When employees send text messages on employer-provided phones, are those texts as private as a message in a bottle … or a message in the sky? The U.S. Supreme Court penned a long-awaited warning last week: For now, employees shouldn’t expect text messages at work to be private.

You can find an abundance of golden career advice on these blogs: BrazenCareerist.com, SimplyBlog, On the Job by Anita Bruzzese and CareerDiva.


Social media is on the rise, creating many questions for employers. Should we use social media to develop business or recruit new talent? Should we let employees use Facebook and Twitter at work? What restrictions do we need? Can we monitor off-duty conduct? And what are the potential liabilities?

Taking one multivitamin a day can strengthen your health arsenal. How about fish oil? Read on to see if fish oil is right for you.
While you can’t change your personality overnight, here are a few steps to engaging more fully in social interactions.
Question: Brigette, an experienced administrative professional is thinking about starting a Career Management business for admins.  She asks, “If you’re thinking about changing careers, what information would help you change careers, move up the ladder, or enhance your visibility and responsibility within your company?” — Brigette

The first rule of negotiating a raise is to make it easy for your boss to say yes. That means anticipating objections and addressing them in advance. Smart negotiators rarely say, “I want more money.” Instead, they use facts to drive home their valuable contributions. Here’s how to prepare for your next salary review:

Question: “Our office is moving to bigger and better premises, and the Managing Director has appointed me Office Manager. I have been his personal administrative assistant. I have no managerial experience, so I’m looking for advice on what my role should entail and how I can become a good manager. I will be overseeing the receptionist.” — Tatjana