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Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

Strategies for keeping your anxiety at bay when under pressure.
Here are some tips on how to represent yourself and your employer with professionalism even in a room full of strangers.
Managing yourself and your career by knowing when to follow directives—and when to break them.

The magic of a thesaurus is that it can take your business writing from drab to unforgettable. Which thesaurus to use? Nothing beats the print version of Roget’s International Thesaurus. But for ease of use, try these bookmarkable online editions:

Join The HR Specialist in celebrating the first-ever “HR Professionals Week,” a five-day tribute to all that human resources pros do to make American workplaces more effective and American businesses more successful. From Monday, March 1 through Friday, March 5, we're offering a full week’s worth of free resources and activities available to all, including open-access podcasts and white papers on the critical issues shaping the HR profession.

Make your résumé more cutting-edge with these tips for 2010: Example: Don't put an objective statement at the top of your résumé. “Ditch it immediately,” advises Jack Williams, vice president of national sales and recruiting for Staffing Technologies. Employers don’t care what a potential hire wants to do. “They care whether they can do what the employer needs them to do,” he says. Other tips:

The widespread use of blogs and social networking web sites such as Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn and Twitter has employers worried about what their employees are keyboarding and texting. Employers must develop electronic communications policies to cope with the new technology.

Sometimes it seems like supervisors and employees work in entirely different places. Several recent studies show that bosses and front-line employees have widely varying views about their organization’s priorities, morale, compensation and benefits. Here are seven key flashpoints:

Check your health insurance plan. It probably covers an eye exam every two years or so. Do you take advantage?
If your professional career lasts long enough, you’ll hear advice from wiser (or at least older) bosses that begins to contradict itself. Then you’ll really be confused.